Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a simplified version of my data:

products:
+----+-----------+
| id | name      |
+----+-----------+
|  1 | Product X |
|  2 | Product Y |
|  3 | Product Z |
+----+-----------+

categories:
+----+---------------+
| id | name          |
+----+---------------+
|  1 | Hotel         |
|  2 | Accommodation |
+----+---------------+

category_product
+----+------------+-------------+
| id | product_id | category_id |
+----+------------+-------------+
|  1 |          1 |           1 |
|  2 |          1 |           2 |
|  3 |          2 |           1 |
|  4 |          3 |           2 |
+----+------------+-------------+

How do I construct an efficient query that will only retrieve products that have both categories "Hotel" and "Accommodation" related (eg. Product X)?

I first tried a join approach

SELECT *
FROM products p
JOIN category_product cp
ON p.id = cp.product_id
WHERE cp.category_id = 1 OR cp.category_id = 2

^ This doesn't work because it doesn't contrain the query to containing both.

I have found an approach using sub-queries that works... but I've been warned against sub-queries for performance reasons:

SELECT *
FROM products p
WHERE
(
    SELECT id
    FROM category_product
    WHERE product_id = p.id
    AND category_id = 1
)
AND
(
    SELECT id
    FROM category_product
    WHERE product_id = p.id
    AND category_id = 2
)

Are there any better solutions (or how about alternatives)? I've considered de-normalizing categories to an extra column on products but would ideally like to avoid that. Hoping for a magic bullet solution!

UPDATE

I've run some of the (great) solutions provided in the answers: My data is 235 000 category_product rows and 58 000 products and obviously benchmarks are always dependent on environment and indexes etc.

"Relational division" @podiluska

2 categories: 2826 rows  ~ 20ms 
5 categories: 46 rows ~ 25-30 ms 
8 categories: 1 rows ~ 25-30 ms 

"Where exists" @Tim Schmelter

2 categories: 2826 rows  ~ 5-7ms 
5 categories: 46 rows ~ 30 ms 
8 categories: 1 rows ~ 300 ms 

One can see the results start to diverge with having a greater number of categories thrown in. I'll look at using "relational division" as it provides consistent results but implementation might cause me to look at "where exists" too (long format http://pastebin.com/6NRX0QbJ)

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT p.*
FROM products p
     inner join 
(
    select product_ID
    from category_product
    where category_id in (1,2)
    group by product_id
    having count(distinct category_id)=2
) pc
    on p.id = pc.product_id

This technique is called "relational division"

share|improve this answer
add comment
select *
from products p
where
    (
        select
            count(distinct cp.category_id)
        from category_product as cp
        where
            cp.product_id = p.id and
            cp.category_id in (1, 2)
    ) = 2

or you can use exists

select *
from products p
where
    exists
    (
        select
            count(distinct cp.category_id)
        from category_product as cp
        where
            cp.product_id = p.id and
            cp.category_id in (1, 2)
        having count(distinct cp.category_id) = 2
    )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer Roman. I tried your first query but it took forever to return a result. Maybe it's because I'm on InnoDB (I've read using count() is not as fast on InnoDB. I've gone to looking at the other solutions which seem more performant. –  stephenfrank Oct 26 '12 at 9:42
    
Yes, i think inner join with grouped table will be better solution –  Roman Pekar Oct 26 '12 at 9:50
add comment

I would use EXISTS:

SELECT P.* FROM Products P
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT 1 FROM category_product cp
    WHERE cp.product_id = p.id
    AND category_id = 1
)
AND EXISTS
(
    SELECT 1 FROM category_product cp
    WHERE cp.product_id = p.id
    AND category_id = 2
)
share|improve this answer
1  
It's not reusable at all. What if you need to check if product not in two categiores, but in 10? in 100? –  Roman Pekar Oct 26 '12 at 8:55
    
@RomanPekar: But that's a different requirement. EXISTS is just the best and most efficient for this. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 26 '12 at 8:56
    
well it make sense. Then, I'll try to find more beautiful syntax for that :) –  Roman Pekar Oct 26 '12 at 9:00
    
Unless you create indexes specifically to optimise this query, my experiments (admittedly on SQL server) show that relational division is faster than exists in most cases –  podiluska Oct 26 '12 at 9:11
    
@podiluska: I presume proper indices(only pks and fks are involved), all the more on sql-server. I often use such queries like above on tables with more than 50M records. They're really efficient. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 26 '12 at 9:15
show 2 more comments
SELECT categories.name,products.name 
FROM 
category_product,category,product 
where 
    category_product.product_id=product.id 
and 
   category_product.category_id=category.id 
    and 
   (
      select count(1) from category_product 
      where 
      category_product.categoty_id=1
      or 
      category_product.categoty_id=2 
     group by product_id having count(1)=2
   )
share|improve this answer
add comment
SELECT p.id
FROM products p
JOIN category_product cp
ON p.id = cp.product_id
WHERE cp.category_id IN (1,2)
GROUP BY p.id
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT cp.category_id) = 2
share|improve this answer
    
it's better to write count(distinct category_id) = 2. It will work in more cases, for example, for more than 2 categories. And for tables where product_id, category_id is not unique combination –  Roman Pekar Oct 26 '12 at 8:57
    
Just in case, I didn't vote down this answer –  Roman Pekar Oct 26 '12 at 8:58
    
I have updated by answer. Although the original would work fine providing there are no duplicates, which there are not in his example and I see no reason for there to be, other than a flawed system. –  Mitch Satchwell Oct 26 '12 at 9:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.