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I've got my Fake object for HttpRequest ready (a wrapper and an interface)... since I don't need to call a constructor, how do I pass in the fake HttpRequest without breaking the interface of this method?

public static int ParseQueryInt(string key, int defaultValue)
{
   NameValueCollection nvc;
   if (HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["name"] != null)
   {
      //Parse strings.
   }
}

EDIT: Akselson's solution is the most creative and this proof of concept worked, much to my surprise, although I also used Skeet's solution as it look more likely to work in all situations.

public class Class1
{  
    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {
        HttpContext.Current = new HttpContext(
new HttpRequest("test.aspx", "http://test.com/test.aspx", "querystring=value"),
new HttpResponse(new StringWriter())
);
        Assert.AreEqual(HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["querystring"], "value");
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can set HttpContext.Current to your own instance:

HttpContext.Current = new HttpContext(
    new HttpRequest("test.aspx","http://test.com/test.aspx","querystring=value"),
    new HttpResponse(new StringWriter())
);

It might be useful if you don't want to change the method before you have it under test.

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One option is introduce another overload:

public static int ParseQueryInt(string key, int defaultValue)
{
    return ParseQuery(key, defaultValue, HttpContext.Current.Request);
}

public static int ParseQueryInt(string key, int defaultValue, 
                                HttpRequest request)
{
   NameValueCollection nvc;
   if (request.QueryString["name"] != null)
   {
      //Parse strings.
   }
}

Then you reduce your "untestable" (or at least "hard to test") code to a simple redirection... you can test the heck out of the version which accepts a request.

share|improve this answer
    
Wau, this was fast! And you were reading my mind too :) –  Petar Repac Aug 20 '09 at 19:47
6  
You could make the second overload internal and use it from test assembly by way of InternalsVisibleTo attribute. So you don't clutter your API for unit testing purposes. –  Petar Repac Aug 20 '09 at 19:50

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