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I have a list of lists that contain integers (this list can be any length and can contain any number of integers:

{{1,2}, {3,4}, {2,4}, {9,10}, {9,12,13,14}}

What I want to do next is combine the lists where any integer matches any integer from any other list, in this case:

   result = {{1,2,3,4}, {9,10,12,13,14}}

I have tried many different approaches but am stuck for an elegant solution.

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2  
what is the significance of the "first or second" here? in particular, one slight edge case is if we first merge: {3,4} and {2,4} to make {3,4,2} (based on the 4), which then doesn't match the {1,2}...? or is the order numeric rather than positional? or is it just "merge when they intersect" ? –  Marc Gravell Oct 26 '12 at 9:13
    
It's not clear how "squares" relate to sequences of 2,3, or more integers. –  Jirka Hanika Oct 26 '12 at 9:13
1  
two foreach loops would do I guess, but to see how much more elegant it could be, we need to see the solution you have just ended up with –  nawfal Oct 26 '12 at 9:16
    
posted a LINQy way –  Jan P. Oct 26 '12 at 10:02
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you just mean "combine when there's an intersection", then maybe something like below, with output:

{1,2,3,4}
{9,10,12}

noting that it also passes the test in your edit, with output:

{1,2,3,4}
{9,10,12,13,14}

Code:

static class Program {
    static void Main()
    {
        var sets = new SetCombiner<int> {
            {1,2},{3,4},{2,4},{9,10},{9,12}
        };
        sets.Combine();
        foreach (var set in sets)
        {
            // edited for unity: original implementation
            // Console.WriteLine("{" +
            //    string.Join(",", set.OrderBy(x => x)) + "}");

            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            foreach(int i in set.OrderBy(x => x)) {
                if(sb.Length != 0) sb.Append(',');
                sb.Append(i);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("{" + sb + "}");
        }
    }
}

class SetCombiner<T> : List<HashSet<T>>
{
    public void Add(params T[] values)
    {
        Add(new HashSet<T>(values));
    }
    public void Combine()
    {
        int priorCount;
        do
        {
            priorCount = this.Count;
            for (int i = Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                if (i >= Count) continue; // watch we haven't removed
                int formed = i;
                for (int j = formed - 1; j >= 0; j--)
                {
                    if (this[formed].Any(this[j].Contains))
                    { // an intersection exists; merge and remove
                        this[j].UnionWith(this[formed]);
                        this.RemoveAt(formed);
                        formed = j;
                    }
                }
            }
        } while (priorCount != this.Count); // making progress
    }
}
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Thank you, this works great. (I tested it using an online compiler). I am programming using Unity3d and it throws this: error CS1503: Argument #2' cannot convert System.Linq.IOrderedEnumerable<int>' expression to type `string[]' I think this is Unity3D specific though. –  Ian Clay Oct 26 '12 at 12:52
    
@Ian is that in the string.Join ? I'll edit... –  Marc Gravell Oct 26 '12 at 12:59
    
Thanks, it works perfectly now :) I was 'almost' heading in the right direction using t.Any(b.Contains) but this has helped my learning a great deal (I couldnt work out how to make it a class or how to structure the for loops). Much appreciated. –  Ian Clay Oct 26 '12 at 13:37
    
I notice that my question is different from my initial question title: "Combine similar character in string in C#" Any suggestions on a new title and how can I edit the title? –  Ian Clay Oct 26 '12 at 14:10
    
Unity3D uses a subset of C#, plus a few of its own additions, so some things which work fine in just straight C# are not supported by Unity. Linq is one of those things. I've had some that work fine, but there are definitely some Linq expressions that Unity doesn't like. –  Darrel Hoffman Oct 26 '12 at 14:14
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Build custom comparer:

public class CusComparer : IComparer<int[]>
{
    public int Compare(int[] x, int[] y)
    {
        x = x.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray();
        y = y.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < Math.Min(x.Length, y.Length); i++ )
        {
            if (x[i] < y[i]) return -1;
            if (x[i] > y[i]) return 1;
        }

         if (x.Length < y.Length) return -1;
        if (x.Length > y.Length) return 1;

        return 0;
    }
}

Then, order by custom comparer first:

List<int[]> input = new List<int[]>()
        {
            new[] { 3, 4 }, new[] { 1, 2 }, new[] { 2, 4 }, 
            new[] { 9, 10 }, new[] { 9, 12 }
        };

var orderedInput = input.OrderBy(x => x, new CusComparer()).ToList();

Use Intersect.Any() to check:

List<int[]> output = new List<int[]>();

int[] temp = orderedInput[0];

foreach (var arr in orderedInput.Skip(1))
{
    if (temp.Intersect(arr).Any())
        temp = temp.Union(arr).ToArray();

    else
    {
        output.Add(temp);
        temp = arr;
    }
}

output.Add(temp);
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Here's a simple, flexible solution using LINQ's Aggregate:

void Main()
{
    var ints = new []{new []{1,2},new []{3,4},new []{2,4},new []{9,10},new []{9,12}};
    var grouped = ints.Aggregate(new List<HashSet<int>>(), Step);

    foreach(var bucket in grouped)
        Console.WriteLine(String.Join(",", bucket.OrderBy(b => b)));
}

static List<HashSet<T>> Step<T>(List<HashSet<T>> all, IEnumerable<T> current)
{
    var bucket = new HashSet<T>();

    foreach (var c in current)
        bucket.Add(c);

    foreach (var i in all.Where(b => b.Overlaps(bucket)).ToArray())
    {
        bucket.UnionWith(i);
        all.Remove(i);
    }
    all.Add(bucket);

    return all; 
}
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We maintain a list of resulting sets (1). For each source set, remove resulting sets that intersect it (2), and add a new resulting set (3) that is the union of the removed sets and the source set (4):

class Program {

    static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CombineSets<T>(
        IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sets,
        IEqualityComparer<T> eq
    ) {

        var result_sets = new LinkedList<HashSet<T>>();         // 1

        foreach (var set in sets) {
            var result_set = new HashSet<T>(eq);                // 3
            foreach (var element in set) {
                result_set.Add(element);                        // 4
                var node = result_sets.First;
                while (node != null) {
                    var next = node.Next;
                    if (node.Value.Contains(element)) {         // 2
                        result_set.UnionWith(node.Value);       // 4
                        result_sets.Remove(node);               // 2
                    }
                    node = next;
                }
            }
            result_sets.AddLast(result_set);                    // 3
        }

        return result_sets;

    }

    static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CombineSets<T>(
        IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> src
    ) {
        return CombineSets(src, EqualityComparer<T>.Default);
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {

        var sets = new[] {
            new[] { 1, 2 }, 
            new[] { 3, 4 }, 
            new[] { 2, 4 }, 
            new[] { 9, 10 }, 
            new[] { 9, 12, 13, 14 }
        };

        foreach (var result in CombineSets(sets))
            Console.WriteLine(
                "{{{0}}}",
                string.Join(",", result.OrderBy(x => x))
            );

    }

}

This prints:

{1,2,3,4}
{9,10,12,13,14}
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Ok i LINQed this up! Hope this is what you wanted... crazy one ;)

void Main()
{
    var matches = new List<List<ComparissonItem>> { /*Your Items*/ };

    var overall =
        from match in matches
        let matchesOne =
            (from searchItem in matches
             where searchItem.Any(item => match.Any(val => val.Matches(item) && !val.Equals(item)))
             select searchItem)
        where matchesOne.Any()
        select
            matchesOne.Union(new List<List<ComparissonItem>> { match })
            .SelectMany(item => item);

    var result = overall.Select(item => item.ToHashSet());
}

static class Extensions
{

    public static HashSet<T> ToHashSet<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        return new HashSet<T>(enumerable);
    }
}

class ComparissonItem
{
    public int Value { get; set; }

    public bool Matches(ComparissonItem item)
    {
        /* Your matching logic*/
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        var other = obj as ComparissonItem;
        return other == null ? false : this.Value == other.Value;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.Value.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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