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if we have a ConcurrentBag<object> safeBag` filled with 100 objects.

then one thread works as:

   foreach(object o in safeBag)
{
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}

the other thread starts right after the 1st thread starts:

{
    safeBag.AddOrTake(something);
}

Will the 2nd thread wait for 100Sec to enter the resource? Another question, if the 1st thread run with Parallel.ForEach(),how will the threads work?

EDIT:The MSDN said:"A List can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with one or more write accesses, the only way to ensure thread safety is to lock the collection during the entire enumeration." Does the Enumerating through the ConcurrentBag cause the 2nd thread waiting at writing access to the ConcurrentBag?

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2  
1st question: Did you try to run a test program with few Console.WriteLine()? –  Adriano Repetti Oct 26 '12 at 9:11
    
2nd question: it depends what you do within your Parallel.ForEach. Again, sorry to insist, first try and then ask what you can't understand (with a complete running example) –  Adriano Repetti Oct 26 '12 at 9:12

2 Answers 2

With most Concurrent* collections most operations are atomic but don't hold any long term locks. The first thread doesn't block the second thread after GetEnumerator() returns.

ConcurrentBag<T>.GetEnumerator Method

The enumeration represents a moment-in-time snapshot of the contents of the bag. It does not reflect any updates to the collection after GetEnumerator was called. The enumerator is safe to use concurrently with reads from and writes to the bag.

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The second thread, assuming you're spawning two threads right in a row - the first using a ThreadStart pointing to the block containing the iteration and the second pointing to that other code block, will not wait for 1000ms. The foreach block will simply wait 1 second between moving to the next object in the set, the second block is unaffected by that.

If it were a parallel foreach, you'd have several threads waiting for a second (concurrently) before moving to the next element. The second block would still not be waiting on the ConcurrentBag to become free.

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MSDN said:"A List<T> can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with one or more write accesses, the only way to ensure thread safety is to lock the collection during the entire enumeration." Does the Enumerating through the ConcurrentBag cause the 2nd thread waiting at writing access to the ConcurrentBag? –  tianyi Oct 26 '12 at 9:24
1  
@tianyi Why are you quoting the documentation for List<T> when you're using CuncurrentBag<T>? –  CodesInChaos Oct 26 '12 at 9:45
    
@mlorbetske no, ConcurrentBag is granted to be thread-safe (even for enumeration) so it won't throw any exception if you modify the collection during enumeration. Concurrent means also that it won't lock anything (the problem isn't with MoveNext()). Moreover thread-safe doesn't mean you'll have the result you may expect (it'll create a COPY of the collection and you'll enumerate the copy so you won't see any change). –  Adriano Repetti Oct 26 '12 at 9:46
    
@Adriano, I was moving more into generality that it is a bad idea to modify the collection you're iterating over (hence the logically inconsistent part - in regard to concurrent collections) –  mlorbetske Oct 26 '12 at 9:48
1  
@mlorbetske hmmmm actually with "normal" collections it's not just a bad idea but you can't do it. With ConcurrentBag it's not a bad idea (but you have to be aware of its behavior because it has implication in performance too). –  Adriano Repetti Oct 26 '12 at 9:50

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