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I have read a dozen questions concerning custom authorization filters in ASP.NET MVC, but none of them tackles what I have in mind.

Here is the setup:

  • ASP.NET MVC 4 project
  • UserProfiles are stored in DB (EF5) and linked to the SimpleMembershipProvider with WebSecurity.InitializeDatabaseConnection. So I can always get a UserProfile based on User.Identity.Name
  • Each User entity has a collection of BlogPost's in a one-to-many relationship.
  • Each BlogPost "knows" the user that owns it via a UserProfile property (thanks EF!).

Imagine that John tries to access http://mysite.com/BlogPosts/Edit/5 and that BlogPost number 5 is Mary's blog post. John is authorized since he is logged in and he passes the built-in authorization scheme, but he does not have the right to edit Mary's blos post. I hope you get the picture.

I know about authorization in ASP.NET MVC and I know that I can build my own custom IAuthorizationFilter. However, my authorization filter has to access the database (DbContext in my case) in order to check whether the entity being edited/deleted, i.e. BlogPost number 5 is owned by the currently logged in user. In other words, the currently logged in user can only edit and delete his "stuff". Each "stuff" knows the user that owns it.

Something like this in pseude code:

var currentlyLoggedUser = this.dbContext.UserProfiles.Single(user => user.Username == this.User.Identity.Name); 

if (blogPost.UserProfile != currentlyLoggedUser)
{
// "John you are not allowed to edit someone else's blog post, you bad boy".
}

So, my two simple questions are: 1. What is the "best practices" way to access the database from within a custom IAuthorizationFilter? Should I somehow inject my IRepository (the interface serving my DbContext) into the authorization filter attribute? Should I try to find my IRepository from the Controller from within the OnAuthorization method of my filter? Is it ok to access the DB from within a filter in the first place? 2. If using an IAuthorizationFilter for this task is not the "best practices" way to do this, then what is?

So to summarize:

How can I make sure that the currently logged user can edit/delete only his "stuff", if every "stuff" knows the user that owns it?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Also Go through the source code of BlogEngine.NET and DotNetNuke

Each post entry should be having a post_author_id or post_owner_id. So by mathcing this id and the id of the logged in user, you can show/hide the edit option effectively.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Edit(int id)
    {
        var post = _service.GetPost(id);
        var currentUser = this.dbContext.UserProfiles.Single(user => user.Username == this.User.Identity.Name); 
        if(post.OwnerId == currentUser.Id)
        {
            // Let him edit, hes the owner of the post.
            return View(post);        
        }
        else
        {
            // send him back to the post or do something else.
            return RedirectToAction("Post", "Home");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am aware that I can do this in the action method body. But is this very cool? I will be doing this same thing in 1000 action methods? Is this the "best practices" approach in MVC? –  hamorphis Oct 26 '12 at 9:57
1  
No I agree this is not the best method if you have 1000 action methods. But for your question which specifically says "Prevent authorized user from editing data", for that 'yes' this is a COOL method. And your attitude towards an answer posted is TOTALLY NOT COOL. Hope that answers your query. –  Yasser Oct 26 '12 at 10:04
    
Also Go through the source code of BlogEngine.NET and DotNetNuke for better answers –  Yasser Oct 26 '12 at 10:07
    
I am sorry for the misunderstanding, but please read my questions again. Here they are: 1. What is the "best practices" way to access the database from within a custom IAuthorizationFilter? 2. If using an IAuthorizationFilter for this task is not the "best practices" way to do this, then what is? Thanks for your help, but that is not what I am looking for. I would like to apologize if I have offended you, but I really felt that the "answer was not helpful" and I don't like to lie. Nothing personal. –  hamorphis Oct 26 '12 at 10:19
    
Dude, answering a question by telling the poster to wade through thousands and thousands of source code lines is not especially helpful. –  Magnus Oct 30 '12 at 22:46

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