Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a start date and end date. the duration between the 2 dates should be in the form of years, months and days. I am new to java. When I run the below method the out I get is 0 years, 12 months 1 days. Please suggest an alternative to get accurate difference in years, months and days.

import java.sql.Date;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.*;

public class Duration {

    private String getAssignmentDuration(java.util.Date oldDate, java.util.Date newDate) {
        Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar c2 = Calendar.getInstance();
        if (oldDate.compareTo(newDate) > 0) {
            c1.setTime(newDate);
            c2.setTime(oldDate);
        } else {
            System.out.println("invalid");
            return "Invalid selection";

        }
        int year = 0;
        int month = 0;
        int days = 0;
        boolean doneMonth = false;
        boolean doneYears = false;
        while (c1.before(c2)) {
            //log.debug("Still in Loop");
            if (!doneYears) {
                c1.add(Calendar.YEAR, 1);
                year++;
            }
            if (c1.after(c2) || doneYears) {
                if (!doneYears) {
                    doneYears = true;
                    year--;
                    c1.add(Calendar.YEAR, -1);
                }   
                if (!doneMonth) {
                    c1.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
                    month++;
                }
                if (c1.after(c2) || doneMonth) {
                    if (!doneMonth) {
                        doneMonth = true;
                        month--;
                        c1.add(Calendar.MONTH, -1);
                    }

                    c1.add(Calendar.DATE, 1);
                    days++;
                    if (c1.after(c2)) {
                        days--;
                    }
                    // this will not be executed
                    if (days == 31 || month==12) {
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println(year + " years, " + month + " months, " + days + " days");
        return year + " years, " + month + " months, " + days + " days";

    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Duration d1= new Duration();
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy/MM/dd");
        java.util.Date oldDate = null;
        try {
            oldDate = sdf.parse("2012/08/29");
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        java.util.Date newDate = null;
        try {
            newDate = sdf.parse("2013/08/31");
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        d1.getAssignmentDuration(oldDate, newDate);
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried? –  Alastair McCormack Oct 26 '12 at 9:56
2  
it is possible duplicate of below link stackoverflow.com/questions/3491679/… –  sunleo Oct 26 '12 at 9:59
1  
@Fuzzyfelt he already posted the code segment that he tried. then what is the purpose of your question ? –  sunil Oct 26 '12 at 10:45
    
@sunil in my opinion the OP has made no effort to debug the code and is looking for someone to give them the solution –  Alastair McCormack Oct 26 '12 at 11:30
add comment

4 Answers

Joda Time has a concept of time Interval that you can use, like:

Interval interval = new Interval(oldDate.getTime(), newDate.getTime());

Then using a Period object, like:

Period period = interval.toPeriod().normalizedStandard(PeriodType.yearMonthDay());

PeriodFormatter formatter = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
            .appendYears()
            .appendSuffix(" year ", " years ")
            .appendSeparator(" and ")
            .appendMonths()
            .appendSuffix(" month ", " months ")
            .appendSeparator(" and ")
            .appendDays()
            .appendSuffix(" day ", " days ")
            .toFormatter();
System.out.println(formatter.print(period));

You will easily be able to print your diference in years and months.

Probably you changes something while posting the question, because to fix your code (note that I didn't tested if your code will work with all sort of ranges), you only need to properly initialize the Calendar objects and the reverse the invalid selection check:

Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar c2 = Calendar.getInstance();
if (oldDate.compareTo(newDate) < 0) {
    c2.setTime(newDate);
    c1.setTime(oldDate);
} else {
    System.out.println("invalid");
    return "Invalid selection";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. Is there a way to obtain the duration without using joda or milli seconds approach? Milliseconds might not provide accurate duration in some locales. Hence i dont wanna use it. Could you please provide a modification in the code that i have used to provide accurate duration. –  Vidya Oct 26 '12 at 10:52
    
@user1776304 If you need to perform the transformation in a specified locale settings, you can use: Interval(long startInstant, long endInstant, DateTimeZone zone). I suggest you should use the joda approach, to fix your code see my updated answer. –  dan Oct 26 '12 at 11:16
    
Even with the fix the output is o years, 12 months, 1 days.. Please help. Thanks. –  Vidya Oct 26 '12 at 11:28
    
@Vidya probably, you are running a different code then what is posted, since I just tested and it's printing: 1 years, 0 months, 2 days –  dan Oct 26 '12 at 11:32
    
Yes sorry am debugging a different code where in the oldDate is 2012/08/31 and newDate is 2013/08/29. The duration is shown wrong. There is variation in days. –  Vidya Oct 26 '12 at 11:57
show 3 more comments
    long diff = today.getTimeInMillis() - birth.getTimeInMillis();


    // Calculate difference in seconds
    long Seconds = diff / 1000;

    // Calculate difference in minutes
    long Minutes = diff / (60 * 1000);

    // Calculate difference in hours
    long Hours = diff / (60 * 60 * 1000);

    // Calculate difference in days
    long Days = diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

    long Months = diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 12 * 1000);

    //lblTsec, lblTmint, lblthours,lblTdays;
    System.out.println("Seconds : " + Seconds + "");
    System.out.println("Minutes : " + Minutes + "");
    System.out.println("Hours : " + Hours + "");
    System.out.println("Days : " + Days + "");
share|improve this answer
add comment

Assume you have Date date1, date2 and they are initialized where date1>date2.

long diff = date1.getTime() - date2.getTime(); //this is going to give you the difference in sec

Date result = new Date(diff);
Format frmt = new SimpleDateFormat("yy MM dd HH:mm:ss");
return frmt.format(result).toString();//or if you want system.out.println(...);
share|improve this answer
    
I think on code line 3, you mean new Date(diff) and not new Date(time)... But your answer seems like the correct one... +1 –  reverse_engineer Aug 1 '13 at 7:30
    
Thanks for correcting, I've editted my mistake –  smttsp Aug 1 '13 at 14:17
add comment
 public static String getDateDifferenceInDDMMYYYY(Date from, Date to) {
        Calendar fromDate=Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar toDate=Calendar.getInstance();
        fromDate.setTime(from);
        toDate.setTime(to);
        int increment = 0;
        int year,month,day;
        System.out.println(fromDate.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));
        if (fromDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) > toDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH)) {
            increment =fromDate.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
        }
         System.out.println("increment"+increment);
// DAY CALCULATION
        if (increment != 0) {
            day = (toDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) + increment) - fromDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            increment = 1;
        } else {
            day = toDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) - fromDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
        }

// MONTH CALCULATION
        if ((fromDate.get(Calendar.MONTH) + increment) > toDate.get(Calendar.MONTH)) {
            month = (toDate.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 12) - (fromDate.get(Calendar.MONTH) + increment);
            increment = 1;
        } else {
            month = (toDate.get(Calendar.MONTH)) - (fromDate.get(Calendar.MONTH) + increment);
            increment = 0;
        }

// YEAR CALCULATION
        year = toDate.get(Calendar.YEAR) - (fromDate.get(Calendar.YEAR) + increment);
     return   year+"\tYears\t\t"+month+"\tMonths\t\t"+day+"\tDays";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
        calendar.set(1999,01,8);
       /*  Calendar calendar1 = Calendar.getInstance();
        calendar1.set(2012,01,23);*/
        System.out.println(getDateDifferenceInDDMMYYYY(calendar.getTime(),new Date()));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Adding an explanation would be nice. –  Steve P. Aug 1 '13 at 6:47
    
Nice answer. It gives the difference in years, months and days, accounting for when the days wrap over a month boundary, or the months wrap over a year boundary. Useful if you want to say 'X expires in 1 year, 2 months and 19 days' –  Neromancer Nov 13 '13 at 21:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.