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Whenever i feel hungry i will publish i am hungry.This will be notified to the service providers say (MealsService,FruitService,JuiceService ).(These service providers know what to serve).

But the serving priority is the concern. Priority here means my first choice is MealsService when there are enough meal is available my need is end with MealsService.To verify the enough meal is availabe the MealsService raises the event "updateMeTheStockStatus" to the "MealsServiceStockUpdateListener" .

The "MealsServiceStockUpdateListener" will only reply back to "MealsService" . No other Service providers ( FruitService,JuiceService ) will be notified by the "MealsServiceStockUpdateListener" .If there is no sufficient stock then only the MealsService passes notification to the JuiceService (as it is the second priority).As usual it checks the stock.If stock is not sufficient it passes message to FruitService,so the flow continues like this.


  1. How can i technically implement this?
  2. Any implemention like priority based delagates and delegate chaining make sense ?

(Somebody! Please reframe it for good readability ).

Update : In this model there is no direct communication between "StackUpdateListener" and "me".Only The "Service Providers" will communicate me.

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To the best of my knowledge, prioritizing the way delegates fire an event is impossible. That being said, you could get away from a publish-to-providers scenario and instead go to a subscribe-to-providers scenario. –  JustLoren Aug 20 '09 at 20:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like other answerers, I'm not entirely convinced that an event is the way forward, but let's go along with it for the moment.

It seems to me that the business with the MealsServiceStockUpdateListener is a red herring really - you're just trying to execute some event handlers but not others. This sort of thing crops up elsewhere when you have a "BeforeXXX" event which allows cancellation, or perhaps some sort of exception handling event.

Basically you need to get at each of your handlers separately. There are two different ways of doing that - either you can use a normal multicast delegate and call GetInvocationList() or you can change your event declaration to explicitly keep a list of handlers:

private List<EventHandler> handlers = new List<EventHandler>();

public event EventHandler MealRequired
{
    add { handlers.Add(value); }
    remove
    {
        int index = handlers.LastIndexOf(value);
        if (index != -1)
        {
            handlers.RemoveAt(index);
        }
    }
}

These two approaches are not quite equivalent - if you subscribe with a delegate instance which is already a compound delegate, GetInvocationList will flatten it but the List approach won't. I'd probably go with GetInvocationList myself.

Now, the second issue is how to detect when the meal has provided. Again, there are two approaches. The first is to use the normal event handler pattern, making the EventArgs subclass in question mutable. This is the approach that HandledEventArgs takes. The second is to break the normal event pattern, and use a delegate that returns a value which can be used to indicate success or failure (and possibly other information). This is the approach that ResolveEventHandler takes. Either way, you execute the delegates in turn until one of them satistfies your requirements. Here's a short example (not using events per se, but using a compound delegate):

using System;

public class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Func<bool> x = FirstProvider;
        x += SecondProvider;
        x += ThirdProvider;

        Execute(x);
    }

    static void Execute(Func<bool> providers)
    {
        foreach (Func<bool> provider in providers.GetInvocationList())
        {
            if (provider())
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Done!");
                return;
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("No provider succeeded");
    }

    static bool FirstProvider()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("First provider returning false");
        return false;
    }

    static bool SecondProvider()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Second provider returning true");
        return true;
    }

    static bool ThirdProvider()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Third provider returning false");
        return false;
    }
}
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i have implemented the working model thanks a lot –  user158977 Aug 21 '09 at 19:00

Rather than publish a message "I'm hungry" to the providers, publish "I need to know current stock available". Then listen until you have enough information to make a request to the correct food service for what you need. This way the logic of what-makes-me-full is not spread amongst the food services... It seems cleaner to me.

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Message passing isn't baked into .NET directly, you need to implement your own message forwarding by hand. Fortunately, the "chain of responsiblity design pattern" is designed specifically for the problem you're trying to solve, namely forwarding a message down a chain until someone can handle it.

Useful resources:

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I'm not sure if you really need a priority event. Anyways, let's suppose we want to code that just for fun.

The .NET Framework has no support for such a peculiar construct. Let me show one possible approach to implement it.

  1. The first step would be to create custom store for event delegates (like described here);

  2. Internally, the custom event store could work like a priority queue;

  3. The specific EventArgs used would be HandledEventArgs (or a subclass of it). This would allow the event provider to stop calling handlers after one of them sets the event as Handled;

  4. The next step is the hardest. How to say to tell the event provider what is the priority of the event handler that is being added?

Let me clarify the problem. Usually, the adding of a handler is like this:

eater.GotHungry += mealsService.Someone_GotHungry;
eater.GotHungry += juiceService.Someone_GotHungry;
eater.GotHungry += fruitService.Someone_GotHungry;

The += operator will only receive an delegate. It's not possible to pass a second priority parameter. There might be several possible solutions for this problem. One would be to define the priority in a custom attribute set at the event handler method. A scond approach is discussed in the question.

Compared to the chain of responsibility implementation at dofactory.com, this approach has some advantages. First, the handlers (your food services) do not need to know each other. Also, handlers can be added and remove at any time dynamically. Of course, you could implement a variation of a chain of responsibility that has this advantages too.

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I don't think delegates are the proper solution to your problem. Delegates are a low-level service provided by C# for relatively tightly coupled events between components. If I understand your question properly (It is worded a little oddly, so I am not sure I clearly understand your problem), then I think what you need is a mediated consumer/provider.

Rather than having your consumers directly consume the meal, juice, and fruit providers, have them request a food item from a central mediator. The mediator would then be responsible for determining what is available and what should be provided to the consumer. The mediator would be a subscriber to events published by all three services. Whenever stock is added/updated in the Meal, Juice, or Fruit services, they would publish their current stock to all subscribers. The mediator, being a subscriber, would track current stock reductions on its own, and be able to determine for itself whether to send a meal, juice, or fruit to a food consumer when a get food request is made.

For example:

    |---------- (GetFoodResponse) ----------------
    V                                            |
FoodConsumer ---- (GetFoodRequest) ------> FoodProvider <-----> [ Local Stock Data ]
                                                 ^               
                                                 |
                                                 |
MealService ---- (PublishStockMessage) ----------|
                                                 ^
JuiceService --- (PublishStockMessage) ----------|
                                                 ^
FruitService --- (PublishStockMessage) ----------|

The benefits of such a solution are that you reduce coupling, properly segregate responsibility, and solve your problem. For one, your consumers only need to consume a single service...the FoodProvider. The FoodProvider subscribes to publications from the other three services, and is responsible for determining what food to provide to a consumer. The three food services are not responsible for anything related to the hunger of your food consumers, they are only responsible for providing food and tracking the stock of the food they provide. You also gain the ability to distribute the various components. Your consumers, the food provider, and each of the three food services can all be hosted on different physical machines if required.

However, to achieve the above benefits, your solution becomes more complex. You have more parts, and they need to be connected to each other properly. You have to publish and subscribe to messages, which requires some kind of supporting infrastructure (WCF, MSMQ, some third party ESB, custom solution, etc.) You also have duplication of data, since the food provider tracks stock on its own in addition to each of the food services, which could lead to discontinuity in available stock. This can be mitigated if you manage stock updated properly, but that would also increase complexity.

If you can handle the additional complexity, ultimately, a solution like this would more flexible and adaptable than a more tightly connected solution that uses components and C# events in a local-deployment-only scenario (as in your original example.)

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I am having a bit of trouble understanding your analogy here, which sounds like you're obscuring the actual intent of the software, but I think I have done something like what you are describing.

In my case the software was telemarketing software and each of the telemarketers had a calling queue. When that queue raises the event signifying that it is nearing empty, the program will grab a list of available people to call, and then pass them through a chain of responsibility which pushes the available call into the telemarketer's queue like so:

Each element in the chain acts as a priority filter: the first link in the chain will grab all of the people who have never been called before, and if it finishes (ie. went through all of the people who have never been called) without filling up the queue, it will pass the remaining list of people to call to the next link in the chain - which will apply another filter/search. This continues until the last link in the chain which just fires off an e-mail to an administrator indicating that there are no available people to be called and a human needs to intervene quickly before the telemarketers have no work to do.

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-1 for working with telemarketers! Just kidding. ;) –  Randy Levy Aug 21 '09 at 1:09

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