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Given a class declaration

class A {
    template <typename T> T foo();
};

I would like to specialize A::foo for various types (int, ...) and type classes (POD, non-POD) of T. Unfortunately, I cannot seem to use std::enable_if for the latter. The following doesn't compile:

template <> int A::foo<int>(); // OK

template <typename T> 
typename std::enable_if<is_pod<T>::value, T>::type foo(); // <<<< NOT OK!

template <typename T> 
typename std::enable_if<!is_pod<T>::value, T>::type foo(); // <<<< NOT OK!

The issue is probably due to the std::enable_if<...> stuff being part of the function signature, and that I did not declare any such member inside A. So how can I specialize a template member based on type traits?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see no reason to specialize here, overloading the function seems to suffice in my mind.

struct A
{
    template <typename T>
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value, T>::type foo()
    {
        std::cout << "integral" << std::endl;
        return T();
    }

    template <typename T>
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<T>::value, T>::type foo()
    {
        std::cout << "not integral" << std::endl;
        return T();
    }
}

When checking for POD or no POD, you only have these two choices, so a more generic function is not needed (and not allowed, because it would be ambiguous). You need more than that? You can check for explicit types without specialization with the help of std::enable_if<std::is_same<int, T>::value, T>::type.

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But you cannot overload on return type only... –  Daniel Gehriger Oct 26 '12 at 11:28
    
@Daniel Gehriger enable_if was made for conditionally removing functions from overload resolutions, so pretty much for exactly this case. –  nijansen Oct 26 '12 at 11:35
    
Yes, but I still have the A::foo<int>() (and many other specializations for some specific types) which will conflict with whatever has been selected by enable_if. –  Daniel Gehriger Oct 26 '12 at 11:53
    
My idea is to replace those with template <typename T> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<int, T>::value, T>::type foo() { /*...*/ } which should have the same effect as your specialization and solves the conflicts –  nijansen Oct 26 '12 at 12:05
    
Right - but we then have to add negative assertions for all of them to the others that also match the type (std::is_integral<T>::value && !std::is_same<T, int>::value), correct? –  Daniel Gehriger Oct 26 '12 at 12:13

I'd just forward this to a structure, which does handle this well:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T, typename = void>
struct FooCaller;

class A {
public:
    template <typename T>
    T foo() {
        // Forward the call to a structure, let the structure choose 
        //  the specialization.
        return FooCaller<T>::call(*this);
    }
};

// Specialize for PODs.
template <typename T>
struct FooCaller<T, typename std::enable_if<std::is_pod<T>::value>::type> {
    static T call(A& self) {
        std::cout << "pod." << std::endl;
        return T();
    }
};

// Specialize for non-PODs.    
template <typename T>
struct FooCaller<T, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_pod<T>::value>::type> {
    static T call(A& self) {
        std::cout << "non-pod." << std::endl;
        return T();
    }
};

// Specialize for 'int'.
template <>
struct FooCaller<int> {
    static int call(A& self) {
        std::cout << "int." << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }
};
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3  
Using std::enable_if here is a bit roundabout. If the primary template admits typename = std::true_type as a defaulted parameter then e.g. typename std::is_pod<T>::type is a shorter way to achieve the same partial specialization. –  Luc Danton Oct 26 '12 at 10:42
    
@LucDanton: Thanks, but how about the !std::is_pod<T>::value part? –  KennyTM Oct 26 '12 at 11:18
    
Not bad - but I need to access A member data from FooCaller, so I would have to forward the call yet again to a member function of A. That starts to look very complicated. –  Daniel Gehriger Oct 26 '12 at 12:15
    
Well, just have a simple template<class C> using not_ = std::integral_constant<bool, !C::value>;. Or make it a struct for compilers that don't support using aliases yet: template<class C> struct not_ : std::integral_constant<bool, !C::value>{}; and use that in the partial spec: FooCaller<not_<std::is_pod<T>>::type> –  Xeo Oct 26 '12 at 12:29
    
Worst scenario you can use std::integral_constant<bool, !std::is_pod<T>::value>. –  Luc Danton Oct 26 '12 at 19:32

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