Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a for loop in bash that runs from 1 to a number sotred in a variable in bash. I have tried doing what the answer to this question tells, but it produces this error:

Syntax error: Bad for loop variable

My OS is Ubuntu 12.04 and the code looks like this:

#!/bin/bash
TOP=10
for ((i=1; i<=$TOP; i++))
do
    echo $i
done

What does this error message mean? Here is an output image:

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
works fine with GNU bash, version 4.1.10(4)-release (i686-pc-cygwin) –  bobah Oct 26 '12 at 10:36
    
My version is GNU bash, version 4.2.24(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu) –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 10:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are running the script with sh, not bash. Try:

bash split_history_file_test.sh
share|improve this answer
    
Jeez, didn't know that, thanks. Doesn't sh run a bash script? –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 10:54
    
@Krøllebølle The Bourne shell (sh) has a different syntax for for loops. The Bash command syntax is a superset of the Bourne shell command syntax. –  Paolo Moretti Oct 26 '12 at 10:57

C-style for loop works only in few shells and bash is among them. This is syntax is not part of POSIX standard.

#!/bin/bash
TOP=10
for ((i=1; i<=$TOP; i++))
do
    echo $i
done

POSIX-compliant for loop will be the following

#!/bin/bash
TOP=10
for i in $(seq 1 $TOP)
do
    echo $i
done

This works both in bash and sh.

To know which shell you are logged in, execute the following command

ps -p $$

Where $$ is PID of current process and the current process is your shell, and ps -p will print information about this process.

To change your login shell use chsh command.

share|improve this answer

This code doesn't produce that error. The bash version shipped with that ubuntu version should execute it without problems.

Note: you want to echo $i.

share|improve this answer
    
The echo $1 was just a typo, fixed now. My script still produces the above error, even though it is seemingly not supposed to. –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 10:39
    
copy-paste your script. how do you execute it? –  Karoly Horvath Oct 26 '12 at 10:40
    
I have copy-pasted in exactly my script now. The script is run by doing "sh file.sh" in the bash and I have first done "chmod +x file.sh". –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 10:44
    
I put in an image showing how i run the file. Ubuntu is run as a virtual machine using VMWare Player (shouldn't matter). –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 10:50
    
sh != bash .... –  Karoly Horvath Oct 26 '12 at 12:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.