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Here is the content of src1.c:

#include <stdio.h>
extern int w;
//int go(char); // no need to declare here. WHY????
  main(){
    char a='f';
    go(a);
    printf("%d\n", w);
}

And here is the content of src2.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int w = 99;
int go(char t){
   printf("%c\n%d\n",t,sizeof(t));
}

Why isn't it mandatory to declare the go function in src1.c file after compiling it in Linux?

 cc src1.c src2.c; 

Does the compiler put the go function's definition from src2.c file above the main function's code so that declaration then would not be required?

In I do it this way:

#include <stdio.h>
int go(char); // need to declare here, because if not, arguments of go will be promoted to intS and they would conflict with char parameters defined in go. Error is droped!
  main(){
    char a='f';
    go(a);
} 
  int go(char t){
   printf("%c\n%d\n",t,sizeof(t));
}

So everyone that says, it is possible to pass whatever number and types of arguments in absence of prototype is wrong. They are promoted to ints in this case, but have to agree with those specified in definition.


I did some tests and found out that even it compiles with no errors it does not work correctly.

src1:

#include <stdio.h>
int go(int t){
    printf("%d\n%d\n",t,sizeof(t));
}

sr2.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int go(int); //if I omit this prototype, program outputs 1 which is far from correct answer :)
main(){ 
    double b=33453.834;
    go(b);
}

So finally the answer could only be undefined behavior.

Thanks Maxim Skurydin

share|improve this question
1  
How did you compile the question? –  Krishnabhadra Oct 26 '12 at 11:07
2  
Please add all the warning output from the compiler. Will help you in the long run. Also learn about header files. –  Ed Heal Oct 26 '12 at 11:08
4  
Always compile with -Wall and address all the warnings. –  SparKot ॐ Oct 26 '12 at 11:09
    
good question BTW –  Krishnabhadra Oct 26 '12 at 11:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's indeed not mandatory to have a prototype for a function before using it, but this is a quirk of the early days of C.

When there is no prototype present, the compiler cannot check the actual types that are being passed to the function or returned by it, which might be very bad in case of mismatch between the usage and declaration.

When compiler sees no prototype for go when go(b); is invoked, it assumes it has the following prototype int go(<any number of arguments can be there>). The default argument promotions are performed on the arguments prior to function invocation. Of course, if there is no function go in another translation module, you will get a linker error.

From c99 standard:

6.5.2.2 Function calls

If the expression that denotes the called function has a type that does not include a prototype, the integer promotions are performed on each argument, and arguments that have type float are promoted to double. These are called the default argument promotions. If the number of arguments does not equal the number of parameters, the behavior is undefined. If the function is defined with a type that includes a prototype, and either the prototype ends with an ellipsis (, ...) or the types of the arguments after promotion are not compatible with the types of the parameters, the behavior is undefined. If the function is defined with a type that does not include a prototype, and the types of the arguments after promotion are not compatible with those of the parameters after promotion, the behavior is undefined, except for the following cases:

— one promoted type is a signed integer type, the other promoted type is the corresponding unsigned integer type, and the value is representable in both types;

— both types are pointers to qualified or unqualified versions of a character type or void.

6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers

2/ If an int can represent all values of the original type, the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.48) All other types are

update:

Does compiler put the go function's definition from src2.c file above the main function's code so that declaration then would not be required?

No, it doesn't put anything. A cite of the standard above says that no prototype is necessary. Each file is compiled independently so when src1.c is compiled, it doesn't know anything about src2.c and a go function definition inside.

So everyone that says, it is posible to pass whatever number and types of arguments in absence of prototype is wrong. They are promoted to intS in this case, but have to agree with those specified in definition.

It is possible and I've faced a couple of obscure bugs after system-wide change that compiled just fine without any warnings for some reason (actually, it's undefined behavior). Again, since each *.c file is compiled independently, there is now way it can check the number of arguments and their types of go function defined in another translation unit. If the function takes more arguments that you have provided, the "unused" arguments will be filled with some random data. You should keep in mind, that if arguments don't match - it's undefined behavior, which means that anything can happen.

share|improve this answer
2  
Not just the integer promotions, but "the default argument promotions", as explained in the cited standard :) This is one of the most obscure things in C. –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 11:36
    
@Lundin Thanks, you are right! Corrected the answer accordingly. –  Maksim Skurydzin Oct 26 '12 at 11:40
    
sorry, what you pasted is correct, but it does not answer my question –  tautvilas Oct 26 '12 at 11:46

First of all, function declarations should be put into header files. Now an answer to your question:
When you compile both the files, then at the time of linking, the linker finds the symbol definition of go() in src2.o and thus resolves the symbol reference in the executable, this is the reason why your program works.

You are trying to use sizeof() which is a compile time operator and it would thus output 1 since you are suing it on a character.
You are also passing an integer value >255 to a char variable, this would cause overflow and t would store 1789modulo255 .

share|improve this answer
    
You should mention what happens if the compiler finds no prototype. –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 11:41
    
so thats the reason for your downvote for my answer and above post. u didn;t find any relevance here... u'd rather have mentioned it yourself!!!! –  Manik Sidana Oct 26 '12 at 13:30
    
Indeed, it is considered polite style on this site to leave a comment if you downvote. I think that the issue with default prototypes is too important to leave out when discussing this topic - there is more going on between the lines than just linking –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 13:47
    
@Lundin The issue of implicit declaration is not too important to discuss in post-C99 as it doesn't guarantee anything. See my updated answer and latest comment. Simple answer is: "Declare prototype for your function" unless you write pre-C99-compliant-only code. –  Blue Moon Oct 26 '12 at 14:25

When you make one executable using these two source files then final executable will have definition of go() so no need of it.

But it's better to put declaration in a header file and then include that header file in both the source files

here is header file someheader.h

#ifndef __SMH_
#define __SMH_

int go(char);

#endif

now include it like this

#include "someheader.h"

in src1.c and src2.c

share|improve this answer
    
You should mention what happens if the compiler finds no prototype. –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 11:41
    
@Lundin: Explaining every thing is fine... but that was not the question I think .. tautvilas: has given the code and asking about what will happen ... so i just explained the given scenario ..now he edited the question as well –  Omkant Oct 26 '12 at 11:45
    
@Lundin : You downvoted for this , didn't you ? –  Omkant Oct 26 '12 at 11:46

By default

go() will be int go(). i.e returns int and accepts any number of arguments. so your actual function matches with default function type.

share|improve this answer
    
why downvote??? –  Jeyaram Oct 26 '12 at 11:34
    
Because there are lots of things between the lines which you don't explain. "By default go() will be int go()" could mean anything. You should explain that if the compiler finds no prototype, it will pick a default type (which returns int and can take any number of arguments). –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 11:40
    
Its a repeated kind of question. so only I gave short answer. –  Jeyaram Oct 26 '12 at 11:42

When the compiler sees go() in str1.c it assumes that the function is defined elsewhere. It's only at the link time that the linker searches for the definition of go().

I think, you are compiling the two files separately and link them together which is fine. Because at link time the defintion of go() exists.

If you try to compile str1.c (gcc str1.c as opposed to gcc -c str1.c)separately, you'll get the error about go() not being found by linker.

UPDATE:

Even the implicit declaration by the compiler is not standard compliant (since C99).

Technically, every function should have a prototype irrespective of its return type if it is called before compiler can see it's defintion. The implicit declaring an int returning function is no longer valid ( valid in C89) and has been removed since C99 (and C11).

Although, most compilers still issue only a warning about this, not an error. But if some compiler refuses to compile due to function prototype not being present, then you can't complain about it as it is not standard compliant.

share|improve this answer
    
You should mention what happens if the compiler finds no prototype. –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 11:43
    
I have given fairly clear explanation of why compiler doesn't give for str1.c as asked in OP. If you are going to be picky about everything, then I won't comment further. –  Blue Moon Oct 26 '12 at 12:07
    
@Lundin No, compiler won't care except declaring one implicitly. By the way, this is no longer done since C99. But gcc will give only a warning, not an error. Care to try void & float about what you said? (in your deleted comment). –  Blue Moon Oct 26 '12 at 12:51
    
It is still standard for the compiler to "attempt to mix together" an argument list though, as long as the number of parameters are the same, see the cited part of C99 in another answer. –  Lundin Oct 26 '12 at 13:45
    
@Lundin No.If expression denotes the called function has a type... E.g. int i=fun(params); is an expression that denotes that fun() returns int and if there's no prototype declared for go() only then implicit declararion is done.In OP's case (expression implies no type as OP simply calls go(b)),so compiler is free to reject the code. So relying on implicit declaration is a bad code. For example, if no prototype is there for fun() in the following: float fun(){return 0.5;} and int main(){printf("%f", fun()); return 0;}then it won't print 0.5. Guess why? so imp. dec. is useless. –  Blue Moon Oct 26 '12 at 14:11

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