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I'm not sure whether this is defined behaviour or not. I have the following code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $string = 'aaaaaa0aaaa';
my $char = substr($string, length($string), 1);
my $char2 = substr($string, length($string)+1, 1);

print Dumper($char);
print Dumper($char2);

Besides getting one warning about substr() past the end of a string, I'm confused about the output:

$VAR1 = '';
$VAR1 = undef;

Perldoc says about substr:

substr EXPR,OFFSET,LENGTH

If OFFSET and LENGTH specify a substring that is partly outside the string, only the part within the string is returned. If the substring is beyond either end of the string, substr() returns the undefined value and produces a warning.

Both length($string) and length($string) + 1 are beyond the (zero-indexed) end of the string, so I don't know why substr returns the empty string in one case and undef in the other. Does it have to do with the NULL character that C uses for string termination and that is somehow returned by substr in the first case, so that there is an "invisible" last character to this string that is not counted by length? Am I missing something obvious here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
substr($string, length($string), 1)

This gave you an empty string because, substr considers the offset between 0 to len(str), and anything beyond that range is undef.

So, substr("aa", 2, 1); -> will give you the empty string after last a
and,substr("aa", 3, 1); -> Will give you undef (Substring completely outside range)

Similarly: -

  • substr("aa", 2, 2); -> Will give you the empty string after last a (Substring partly outside the range)

Now, for the second one: -

substr($string, length($string) + 1, 1)

This is already past the last allowed offset. So it returns undef value.

Suppose: -

$str = "abcd";

Then, the index will look like: -

  a   b   c   d             undef
0   1   2   3  len(str)  len(str) + 1

UPDATE: -

So, as @Borodin explained in his post, the character d comes between the offsets - 3 and len(str) in the above example.

But, if we try to access anything beyond len(str) including len(str), we will get an empty string, as in the documentation, which says that -

If OFFSET and LENGTH specify a substring that is partly outside the string, only the part within the string is returned.

Also, if we try to access anything beyond len(str) excluding the len(str), we will get undef value, as in docs: -

If the substring is beyond either end of the string, substr() returns the undefined value and produces a warning.

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Thank you, that really cleared it up! –  mpe Oct 26 '12 at 12:09
    
@mpe. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 12:11
    
I actually think this is a perl bug. While it can be argued that the start of the requested substring is at the end of the string, rather than beyond, the actual contents of the substring is clearly entirely beyond the string, so it should return undef. –  ilmari Oct 26 '12 at 12:19
    
@ilmari. Well, if we say that a String ends with an empty string '', then I think there is nothing wrong with that. And also, may be this is a bug, because that is assigning an index to that empty string. –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 12:22
    
@ilmari. If we see same thing in Java: - "ab".endsWith(""); will return true. But, accessing the character at index 2 by "ab".charAt(2) throws an exception. So may be this is a bug in Perl, or Perl is designed to work that way. –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 12:24

There are a couple of issues here. Firstly you should consider the substr offset to indicate position between characters thus:

 S T R I N G
0 1 2 3 4 5 6

so you can see that offset 6 - the length of the string - is at the end of the string, not beyond it.

Secondly the length parameter of substr serves as an upper limit to the number of characters returned, not a requirement. That is what the documentation means by only the part within the string is returned.

Putting these together, a call like substr 'STRING', 6, 1 - asking for a maximum of one character at the end of the string - returns the empty string, while asking for anything beyond the end of the string (or before its start) gives undef.

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@Borodin.. +1 Ok, I got it now. The indexing makes it more clear. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 26 '12 at 12:50
    
Thanks to you, too, for additional clarification! –  mpe Oct 26 '12 at 15:04

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