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Please can someone help me in how to count number of operations for (for nested loop) like this one:

for(int c=0; c<10; c++){
    for(int j=0; j<n; j++)
       for(int r=0; r<n; r++)
           cout<<j;
      cout<<endl;
      }
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closed as too localized by Andrey, Joachim Pileborg, Tadeusz Kopec, Oleh Prypin, Bo Persson Oct 26 '12 at 21:51

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n*n*10. Where's the point in this?? –  SinisterMJ Oct 26 '12 at 11:51
    
is that an interview question? Probably someone playing smart with the fact that there are no braces arround the inner for statement so endl will only be printed n*10 times. Still you have to define what do you mean by operation etc –  Ivaylo Strandjev Oct 26 '12 at 11:52
    
@izomorphius Indeed, does incrementing the counters count as an operation? –  Bernhard Oct 26 '12 at 11:56

4 Answers 4

That would be (roughly proportional to) 10n2.

Not exactly, depending on how you define operations. For example, the output of the newline only happens 10 times.

So, if your operation was a cout statement, it would be 10n2 + 10.

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n*n*10 + 10, if both std::cout << j and std::cout << endl; count as a separate operation.

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correct indentation would be:

for(int c=0; c<10; c++) {
    for(int j=0; j<n; j++)
        for(int r=0; r<n; r++)
            cout<<j;
    cout<<endl;
}

adding the missing braces you get:

for(int c=0; c<10; c++) {
    for(int j=0; j<n; j++) {
        for(int r=0; r<n; r++) {
            cout<<j;
        }
    }
    cout<<endl;
}

now you can clearly see how many times it will print:

(10 * n * n) + (10)
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I think what you have do is just to determine the big(O) for this code which is O(n^2). what about C++ , j++ and r++? also,c=0,j=0 and r=0 each of these statements we can consider it as an operation,so as in the loop how I can evaluate the number of iteration for each one? –  user1735329 Oct 26 '12 at 13:15
    
@user1735329 you need to first define operation for that but it's highly architecture dependant. r++ might correspond to one machine level instruction in one machine and three instructions in another. it is usually not required, why exactly do you need it for? –  gokcehan Oct 26 '12 at 13:55

The number of iterations is

  10 * n * n
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