Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to read in from stdin (passing in value from a file). I am reading each character from the string and storing it into a dynamically allocated string pointer. When needed I realloc the memory. I am trying to get as many characters as possible. Though I can limit it to 100,000 chars. But the realloc fails after some iteration. But if I specify a chunk size big, say 1048567 during the first initialization in malloc, I am able to read the string completely. Why is this?

Below is my program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int display_mem_alloc_error();

enum {
    CHUNK_SIZE = 31    //31 fails. But 1048567 passes.
};

int display_mem_alloc_error() {
    fprintf(stderr, "\nError allocating memory");
    exit(1);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int numStr;                  //number of input strings
    int curSize = CHUNK_SIZE;    //currently allocated chunk size
    int i = 0;                   //counter
    int len = 0;                 //length of the current string
    int c;                       //will contain a character
    char *str = NULL;            //will contain the input string
    char *str_cp = NULL;         //will point to str
    char *str_tmp = NULL;        //used for realloc

    str = malloc(sizeof(*str) * CHUNK_SIZE);
    if (str == NULL) {
        display_mem_alloc_error();
    }    
    str_cp = str;   //store the reference to the allocated memory

    scanf("%d\n", &numStr);   //get the number of input strings
    while (i != numStr) {
        if (i >= 1) {   //reset
            str = str_cp;
            len = 0;
            curSize = CHUNK_SIZE;
        }
        c = getchar();
        while (c != '\n' && c != '\r') {
            *str = (char *) c;
            //printf("\nlen: %d -> *str: %c", len, *str);
            str = str + 1;
            len = len + 1;
            *str = '\0';
            c = getchar();
            if (curSize / len == 1) {
                curSize = curSize + CHUNK_SIZE;
                //printf("\nlen: %d", len);
                printf("\n%d \n", curSize);    //NB: If I comment this then the program simply exits. No message is displayed.
                str_tmp = realloc(str_cp, sizeof(*str_cp) * curSize);
                if (str_tmp == NULL) {
                    display_mem_alloc_error();
                }
                //printf("\nstr_tmp: %d", str_tmp);
                //printf("\nstr: %d", str);
                //printf("\nstr_cp: %d\n", str_cp);
                str_cp = str_tmp;
                str_tmp = NULL;
            }
        }
        i = i + 1;
        printf("\nlen: %d", len);
        //printf("\nEntered string: %s\n", str_cp);
    }
    str = str_cp;
    free(str_cp);
    free(str);
    str_cp = NULL;
    str = NULL;
    return 0;
}

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Note that sizeof (char) is always 1, so adding using it in memory-allocation calls is generally considered a bad idea. It adds nothing (you multiply by 1) except noise for the humans reading the code. –  unwind Oct 26 '12 at 12:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you realloc

str_tmp = realloc(str_cp, sizeof(*str_cp) * curSize);
if (str_tmp == NULL) {
    display_mem_alloc_error();
}
//printf("\nstr_tmp: %d", str_tmp);
//printf("\nstr: %d", str);
//printf("\nstr_cp: %d\n", str_cp);
str_cp = str_tmp;
str_tmp = NULL;

you let str_cp point to the new block of memory, but str still points into the old, now freed block. Thus when you access what str points to in the next iteration, you invoke undefined behaviour.

You need to save the offset of str with respect to str_cp, and after the reallocation, letstr point into the new block at its old offset.

And *str = (char *) c; is wrong, although there is a nonzero chance of it being functionally equivalent to the correct *str = c;.

share|improve this answer
    
After the str_cp = str_tmp; I added str = str_cp + len; as you mentioned and the program works perfectly. Wow! Thanks to all. –  kadaj Oct 26 '12 at 13:17
     *str = (char *) c;

This line is wrong.

str is a pointer to char and *str is a char but you are assigning a pointer to char to a char. This cannot be done in C.

Moreover:

scanf("%d\n", &numStr);

The \n in scanf call probably does not what you expect:

http://c-faq.com/stdio/scanfhang.html

And also:

str = str_cp;
free(str_cp);
free(str);

You have a double free here. After the assignment str and str_cp will have the same value so doing:

free(str_cp);
free(str);

is as if you do:

free(str);
free(str);

which is undefined behavior (you cannot free twice).

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't *s = 'a'; correct? I am dereferencing the pointer and saving the value to the place pointed by the s, right? In the above case, since c is an int, I am converting it into char, no? Isn't it same as say s[0] = (char*)c; ? –  kadaj Oct 26 '12 at 12:24
1  
@kadaj No. You seem to think that the asterisk on the right hand side doesn't matter, but it does! A cast to (char) is not the same as a cast to (char *). The former is "character", the latter is "pointer to character". Casting an int to a pointer is very often not the right thing to do. –  unwind Oct 26 '12 at 12:26
    
Oh! Using (char) is okay, right? But the program pastebin.com/Gd0Nyv0z seems to work. But that might be undefined behavior. I get that casting mistake. –  kadaj Oct 26 '12 at 12:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.