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When I write special latin1 characters, for example

á, é ã , ê

to an utf-8 encoded mysql table, is that data lost ?

The charset for that table is utf-8.

Is there any way to get that latin1 encoded rows back so I can convert to utf-8 and write back (this time in the right way)?

Update

I think I wasn't very specific about what I meant with "data". By data I mean the special characters, not the row.

When selecting, I still get the row and the fields, but with '?' instead of special latin1 characters. It is possible to recover those '?' and transform to the right utf8 ones?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the whole database (or a whole table) is affected, you can first verify that it is a Latin1-as-UTF8 charset problem with SET NAMES Latin1:

mysql> select txt from tbl;
+-----------+
| txt       |
+-----------+
| Québec   |
| Québec   |
+-----------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SET NAMES Latin1;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select txt from tbl;
+---------+
| txt     |
+---------+
| Québec  |
| Québec  |
+---------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

If this verifies, i.e. you get the desired data when using default charset Latin-1, then you can dump the whole table forcing --default-character-set=latin1 so that a file will be created with the correct data, albeit with the wrong charset specification.

But now you can replace the header row stating

/*!40101 SET NAMES latin1 */;

with UTF8. Reimport the database and you're done.

If only some rows are affected, then it is much more difficult:

SELECT txt, CAST(CAST(txt AS CHAR CHARACTER SET Latin1) AS BINARY) AS utf8 FROM tbl;

+-----------+---------+
| txt       | utf8    |
+-----------+---------+
| Québec   | Québec  |
+-----------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

...but you have the problem of locating the affected rows. Some of the code points you might find with

WHERE txt LIKE '%Ã%'

but for the others, you'll have to sample manually.

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The data is not lost. See this SQLFiddle example

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In the sql fiddle, how are your inserting the latin1 encoded chars? In the example I just see you inserting regular utf8 ones. –  Onilton Maciel Oct 26 '12 at 13:48

The additional affected rows can be found using the following:

SELECT column
FROM table
WHERE NOT HEX(column) REGEXP '^([0-7][0-9A-F])*$'
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