Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running some micro benchmarks on Java list iteration code. I have used -XX:+PrintCompilation, and -verbose:gc flags to ensure that nothing is happening in the background when the timing is being run. However, I see something in the output which I cannot understand.

Here's the code, I am running the benchmark on:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class PerformantIteration {

    private static int theSum = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Starting microbenchmark on iterating over collections with a call to size() in each iteration");
        List<Integer> nums = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        for(int i=0; i<50000; i++) {
            nums.add(i);
        }

        System.out.println("Warming up ...");
        //warmup... make sure all JIT comliling is done before the actual benchmarking starts
        for(int i=0; i<10; i++) {
            iterateWithConstantSize(nums);
            iterateWithDynamicSize(nums);
        }

        //actual        
        System.out.println("Starting the actual test");
        long constantSizeBenchmark = iterateWithConstantSize(nums);
        long dynamicSizeBenchmark = iterateWithDynamicSize(nums);
        System.out.println("Test completed... printing results");

        System.out.println("constantSizeBenchmark : " + constantSizeBenchmark);
        System.out.println("dynamicSizeBenchmark : " + dynamicSizeBenchmark);
        System.out.println("dynamicSizeBenchmark/constantSizeBenchmark : " + ((double)dynamicSizeBenchmark/(double)constantSizeBenchmark));
    }

    private static long iterateWithDynamicSize(List<Integer> nums) {
        int sum=0;
        long start = System.nanoTime();        
        for(int i=0; i<nums.size(); i++) {
            // appear to do something useful
            sum += nums.get(i);
        }       
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        setSum(sum);
        return end-start;
    }

    private static long iterateWithConstantSize(List<Integer> nums) {
        int count = nums.size();
        int sum=0;
        long start = System.nanoTime();        
        for(int i=0; i<count; i++) {
            // appear to do something useful
            sum += nums.get(i);
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        setSum(sum);
        return end-start;
    }

    // invocations to this method simply exist to fool the VM into thinking that we are doing something useful in the loop
    private static void setSum(int sum) {
        theSum = sum;       
    }

}


Here's the output.

    152   1       java.lang.String::charAt (33 bytes)
    160   2       java.lang.String::indexOf (151 bytes)
    165   3Starting microbenchmark on iterating over collections with a call to size() in each iteration       java.lang.String::hashCode (60 bytes)
    171   4       sun.nio.cs.UTF_8$Encoder::encodeArrayLoop (490 bytes)
    183   5
       java.lang.String::lastIndexOf (156 bytes)
    197   6       java.io.UnixFileSystem::normalize (75 bytes)
    200   7       java.lang.Object::<init> (1 bytes)
    205   8       java.lang.Number::<init> (5 bytes)
    206   9       java.lang.Integer::<init> (10 bytes)
    211  10       java.util.ArrayList::add (29 bytes)
    211  11       java.util.ArrayList::ensureCapacity (58 bytes)
    217  12       java.lang.Integer::valueOf (35 bytes)
    221   1%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::main @ 21 (173 bytes)
Warming up ...
    252  13       java.util.ArrayList::get (11 bytes)
    252  14       java.util.ArrayList::rangeCheck (22 bytes)
    253  15       java.util.ArrayList::elementData (7 bytes)
    260   2%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize @ 19 (59 bytes)
    268   3%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize @ 12 (57 bytes)
    272  16       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize (59 bytes)
    278  17       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize (57 bytes)
Starting the actual test
Test completed... printing results
constantSizeBenchmark : 301688
dynamicSizeBenchmark : 782602
dynamicSizeBenchmark/constantSizeBenchmark : 2.5940773249184588


I don't understand these four lines from the output.

260   2%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize @ 19 (59 bytes)
268   3%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize @ 12 (57 bytes)
272  16       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize (59 bytes)
278  17       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize (57 bytes)


  • Why are both these methods being compiled twice ?
  • How do I read this output... what do the various numbers mean ?
share|improve this question
    
Thanks @Thomas Jungblut Not sure how I missed out -XX:+PrintCompilation from the title –  Parag Oct 26 '12 at 12:46
2  
np, here is a good resource about compilations: gist.github.com/1165804#file_notes.md –  Thomas Jungblut Oct 26 '12 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

I am going to attempt answering my own question with the help of this link posted by Thomas Jungblut.

260   2%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize @ 19 (59 bytes)
268   3%      performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize @ 12 (57 bytes)
272  16       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize (59 bytes)
278  17       performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithDynamicSize (57 bytes)

First column

The first column '260' is the timestamp.

Second column

The second column is the compilation_id and method_attributes. When a HotSpot compilation is triggered, every compilation unit gets a compilation id. The number in the second column is the compilation id. JIT compilation, and OSR compilation have two different sequences for the compilation id. So 1% and 1 are different compilation units. The % in the first two rows, refer to the fact that this is an OSR compilation. An OSR compilation was triggered because the code was looping over a large loop, and the VM determined that this code is hot. So an OSR compilation was triggered, which would enable the VM to do an On Stack Replacement and move over to the optimized code, once it is ready.

Third column

The third column performance.api.PerformantIteration::iterateWithConstantSize is the method name.

Fourth column

The fourth column is again different when OSR compilation happens and when it does not. Let's look at the common parts first. The end of the fourth column (59 bytes), refers to the size of the compilation unit in bytecode (not the size of the compiled code). The @ 19 part in OSR compilation refers to the osr_bci. I am going to quote from the link mentioned above -

A "place" in a Java method is defined by its bytecode index (BCI), and the place that triggered an OSR compilation is called the "osr_bci". An OSR-compiled nmethod can only be entered from its osr_bci; there can be multiple OSR-compiled versions of the same method at the same time, as long as their osr_bci differ.

Finally, why was the method compiled twice ?

The first one is an OSR compilation, which presumably happened while the loop was running due to the warmup code (in the example), and the second compilation is a JIT compilation, presumably to further optimize the compiled code ?

share|improve this answer
    
if you are getting OSR code during warm up "you're doing it wrong". Also list the arguments of the JVM, it could be just C1 (client/dumb compiler) and C2 (the smarter, slow compiler). The recompilation can a result of deoptimization as well. The easiest (?) way is listing the generated code, if you see the C1 stubs, you know it's the C1 code. –  bestsss Oct 26 '12 at 13:49
    
@bestsss Why is that ? I think the OSR compilation is happening because the example's warmup code calls a large loop. –  Parag Oct 26 '12 at 13:50
    
My point is if you try to warm up anything, you should avoid the OSR, split it in smaller methods. –  bestsss Oct 26 '12 at 13:51
    
If you disable the tiered compilation (-XX:-TieredCompilation) and leave the C2 only, you can be sure it's OSR+C2. –  bestsss Oct 26 '12 at 13:55
    
@bestsss Thanks, I tried that. The result was identical to what I got without -XX:-TieredCompilation. So I guess it was OSR+C2. Listing the code in compilation units is a good idea. It might give some idea about why the recompilation was attempted. –  Parag Oct 27 '12 at 12:56

I think first time OSR happened , then it change the Invocation Counter tigger method compilar (PS: sorry, my english is pool)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.