Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to create and configure Windows Workflow Foundation rules from an ASP.Net application? There is the System.Workflow.Activities.Rules.Design.RuleSetDialog for Windows Forms projects, but is there some equivalent for ASP.Net MVC projects using the Razor view engine?

Anyway, I need to be able to create rules from within an ASP.Net client, save them in a database and evaluate the rules in a service later on. Is there perhaps something new in WF4 that can help me with this?

share|improve this question
    
That's a 3.0 component, not WF4. Rules were deprecated in 4, but still supported now for 3.0-based workflows. Its not easy to tell, but (for UI components at least) for the fact that 4 UI is WPF based, whereas 3 is Forms based. If you want to use this for 4, go ahead and put the tag back on, but the answer is "you're headed in the wrong direction" –  Will Oct 26 '12 at 14:30
    
@Will, I know that it is a WF3 component, but it's not quite clear what the equivalent in WF4 is. If there is any? –  Joel Oct 29 '12 at 9:17
    
They are not applicable at all in 4. So its hard to come up with an "equivalent." If you are working on WF4 workflows, forget about "rules." –  Will Oct 29 '12 at 12:44
    
@Will, Ok, that is good to know. Do you know any good .Net 4 approach for creating a rule engine? I liked the idea of using System.Workflow.Activities.Rules, but it doesn't feel good to use depracated APIs –  Joel Oct 29 '12 at 13:01
    
Workflows are a rule engine. I'm not sure what else to say. –  Will Oct 29 '12 at 13:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can't find any .NET 4 samples, but there is a .NET 3 sample for creating RuleSets using the object model. I would assume you need to create your own custom UI for it and create your RuleSets via the object model to handle this in a web application.

Referenced .NET 3 Samples - The sample I'm referring to is called "Creating rules using the object model"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.