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I have generic class type, T as follow:

class MyClass<T>

Also I know that T is interface with only one method inside but I don't know what interface, I can't write this:

class MyClass< T extends TheInterface >

So is there a way to invoke this method?

public void callMe(T me, Object...params){
    // How can I invoke T interface method?
}

I been trying this:

public void callMe(T me, Object... params) {
// methods.length is 244, just as in my activity class
        Method[] methods = me.getClass().getMethods(); 
        try {
            methods[0].invoke(me, params);
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;


        }
}

But it's not working

Edit: I posted new question that explain why I need this for

share|improve this question
2  
what's not working? Error message please –  RNJ Oct 26 '12 at 12:47
4  
Not being able to know in advance what interface (or super interface) you will get sounds very much like a problem in the design. Relying on reflection to call a method is rarely a good strategy. My personal experience suggests that you should find a way to improve the design (maybe use the Adapter pattern) rather than trying to call a method which you don't even know the name at runtime. –  Laf Oct 26 '12 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

Yes, you have to write:

class MyClass< T extends TheInterface >

With this information, the compiler know that T have an operation named callMe

share|improve this answer
    
See my edit please –  Ilya_Gazman Oct 26 '12 at 12:56
    
Ok. Can you reconsider the design to make this approach possible? –  Aubin Oct 26 '12 at 13:00
    
No I can't, each time is going to be a different interface with nothing in common –  Ilya_Gazman Oct 26 '12 at 13:01
2  
@Babibu Each time it's going to be a different interface with nothing in common, but each interface will have exactly one method that always needs to be invoked? –  Less Oct 26 '12 at 13:05
1  
@Babibu: please provide more information of what you are planning to achieve so we get a better picture of how to implement it. Where are the interfaces coming from? –  Campfire Oct 26 '12 at 13:30

I'm not sure, are you looking for the Strategy pattern?

share|improve this answer
    
What is that pattern? –  Ilya_Gazman Oct 26 '12 at 13:00
    
@Babibu en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern –  Less Oct 26 '12 at 13:02
    
No, it's not what I am looking for –  Ilya_Gazman Oct 26 '12 at 13:07

If you can not change declaration inside MyClass then you can just typecast it.

    public void callMe(T me, Object... params) {
        Someinterface instance = (Someinterface) me;
        list.callMe(me, params);
    }

But still declaring it like below should be the best solution

class MyClass<T extends Someinterface >

Below is the simple demonstration of how to do it using reflection

 class MyClass<T> {
    public void callMe(T me, Object... params) throws SecurityException,
            NoSuchMethodException {
        // How can I invoke T interface method?
        Method size = me.getClass().getMethod("size", null);
        Method add = me.getClass().getMethod("add", Object.class);

        try {
            add.invoke(me, 10);
            System.out.println(size.invoke(me, params));

        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;

        }
    }
}


    MyClass<List> myclass = new MyClass<List>();
    myclass.callMe(new ArrayList(), null);

Output :

  1 
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what do you mean by typecast it. I also do not know that name of that method, so I can't invoke it by name like in your example with "size" and "add" –  Ilya_Gazman Oct 26 '12 at 13:23

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