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We are using a application protocol which specifies the length indicator of the message in the first 4 bytes. Socket.Receive will return as much data as in the protocol stack at the time or block until data is available. This is why we have to continously read from the socket until we receive the number of bytes in the length indicator. The Socket.Receive will return 0 if the other side closed the connection. I understand all that.

Is there a minimum number of bytes that has to be read? The reason I ask is from the documentation it seems entirely possible that the entire length indicator (4 bytes) might not be available when socket.Receive can return. We would then have to have to keep trying. It would be more efficient to minimize the number of times we call socket.receive because it has to copy things in and out of buffers. So is it safer to get a single byte at a time to get the length indicator, is it safe to assume that 4 bytes will always be available or should we keep trying to get 4 bytes using an offset variable?

The reason that I think that there may be some sort of default minimum level is that I came across a varaible called ReceiveLowWater variable that I can set in the socket options. But this appears to only apply to BSD. MSDN See SO_RCVLOWAT.

It isn't really that important but I am trying to write unit tests. I have already wrapped a standard .Net Socket behind an interface.

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2  
It's very unlikely but you should be able to deal with arbitrary-sized reads. Even 1 byte. Since it's very unlikely that this will happen most of the time you should get almost no performance hit. If those 4 bytes are not at the very start of the stream it's actually quite likely that they will be split between reads. –  cdleonard Oct 26 '12 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

is it safe to assume that 4 bytes will always be available

NO. Never. What if someone is testing your protocol with, say, telnet and a keyboard? Or over a real slow or busy connection? You can receive one byte at a time or a split "length indicator" over multiple Receive() calls. This isn't unit testing matter, it's basic socket matter that causes problems in production, especially under stressful situations.

or should we keep trying to get 4 bytes using an offset variable?

Yes, you should. For your convenience, you can use the Socket.Receive() overload that allows you to specify a number of bytes to be read so you won't read too much. But please note it can return less than required, that's what the offset parameter is for, so it can continue to write in the same buffer:

byte[] lenBuf = new byte[4];
int offset = 0;

while (offset < lenBuf.Length)
{       
    int received = socket.Receive(lenBuf, offset, lenBuf.Length - offset, 0);

    offset += received;     

    if (received == 0)
    {
        // connection gracefully closed, do your thing to handle that
    }
}

// Here you're ready to parse lenBuf

The reason that I think that there may be some sort of default minimum level is that I came across a varaible called ReceiveLowWater variable that I can set in the socket options. But this appears to only apply to BSD.

That is correct, the "receive low water" flag is only included for backwards compatibility and does nothing apart from throwing errors, as per MSDN, search for SO_RCVLOWAT:

This option is not supported by the Windows TCP/IP provider. If this option is used on Windows Vista and later, the getsockopt and setsockopt functions fail with WSAEINVAL. On earlier versions of Windows, these functions fail with WSAENOPROTOOPT". So I guess you'll have to use the offset.

It's a shame, because it can enhance performance. However, as @cdleonard pointed out in a comment, the performance penalty from keeping an offset variable will be minimal, as you'l usually receive the four bytes at once.

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Your code is basically what I am querying about. From the documentation, that overload may return less than the 4 bytes you asked for. I use the above but in a while loop to get all the data specified in the length indicator. I know that is the correct way to do it because I have come across it many times in text and other reputable SO users. But why are you suggesting that the same method will always get at least 4 bytes when we have to put that section of code in a while loop to get the body. –  uriDium Oct 30 '12 at 9:00
    
@uriDium you're right, I was confused with another implementation that kept Receive()ing until size bytes were read. As stated in the docs: "If you are using a connection-oriented Socket, the Receive method will read as much data as is available, up to the number of bytes specified by the size parameter.". So yeah, you'll have to do the offset magic. –  CodeCaster Oct 30 '12 at 9:02
    
but as far as you know, is there some sort of minimum water level type feature for sockets on windows platform? The same way there is for BSD systems? –  uriDium Oct 30 '12 at 9:08
    
@uriDium unfortunately there isn't, see edit. :-) –  CodeCaster Oct 30 '12 at 10:00
1  
Shouldn't the value passed as 3rd paramter to Receive() shrink in the same way, as offset grows? If it doesn't and more data then the buffer's size is arriving, most propably a buffer overflow will occur. –  alk Oct 30 '12 at 10:30

No, there isn't a minimum buffer size, the length in the receive just needs to match the actual space.

If you send a length in four bytes before the messages actual data, the recipient needs to handle the cases where 1, 2, 3 or 4 bytes are returned and keep repeating the read until all four bytes are received and then repeat the procedure to receive the actual data.

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