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I have a doubt regarding pthread_cond_wait and pthread_cond_signal functions. I was not able to understand after reading the man pages also.

Please consider the following code.

void* thread_handler(){
... // counts till COUNT_LIMIT is reached
if (count == COUNT_LIMIT) {
  pthread_cond_signal(&count_threshold_cv);
  printf("inc_count(): thread %ld, count = %d  Threshold reached.\n",
         my_id, count);
}
printf("inc_count(): thread %ld, count = %d, unlocking mutex\n",
       my_id, count);
...
}

void* thread_handler1(){
... // waits till the previous thread has finished counting
pthread_mutex_lock(&count_mutex);
while (count<COUNT_LIMIT) {
   pthread_cond_wait(&count_threshold_cv, &count_mutex);
   printf("watch_count(): thread %ld Condition signal received.\n", my_id);
}
pthread_mutex_unlock(&count_mutex);
pthread_exit(NULL);
}

The code is working as per expectations. I am trying to understand the code. Here is how the program works

  1. Enter thread_handler1 and do cond_wait. From the man page i understood that cond_wait will immediatly release the lock atomically. So why are they releasing the lock again below in thread_handler1

  2. After first thread has satisfied the condition and hits the condition signal I expected the thread which was blocking to execute its steps. Instead i got the printfs below the thread which executed the cond_signal. Why is this happening

  3. Overall why do we need to take a lock before waiting and signalling. Cant this be done without a lock.

For a briefer look at the program, please see the Complete program here. You can find it under the section "Using Conditional Variables"

Thanks in advance

Chidambaram

share|improve this question
    
Note that the mutex should be locked whenever you modify count and should normally be held until pthread_cond_signal has been called. ie. the sequence is: lock, modify, signal (if 'ready'), unlock. –  William Morris Oct 26 '12 at 13:50
    
@WilliamMorris: If you don't need to prevent new waiters from arriving right before you signal, you will achieve better performance by unlocking the mutex before calling pthread_cond_signal (fewer context switches and/or fewer round trips to kernelspace). –  R.. Oct 26 '12 at 18:03
    
@R..: Keeping the mutex locked always works, whatever the nature of activity on other threads. Performance is only an issue if these signalling events are happening very frequently. Does the performance issue you raise have to do with exactly when the implementation tries to wake the waiter? If it tries to wake immediately upon signal delivery then clearly it cannot (as the signaller still has the mutex) - this might have a slight performance hit. But if the implementation waits until the mutex is freed, then is there any performance difference? –  William Morris Oct 26 '12 at 22:45
    
On Linux, signalling while the mutex is locked will not wake the waiter, but will instead use a special futex command to requeue the waiter onto the mutex instead of the condition variable. However, this then requires a second system call when you subsequently unlock the mutex to wake the waiter, i.e. an extra round-trip to kernelspace. If the mutex is already unlocked, then the signal can directly wake the waiter, and only one round-trip to kernelspace is required. –  R.. Oct 27 '12 at 0:18
    
On implementations that lack a "requeue" command like Linux has, the difference should be much more severe: the waiter will actually get woken, then immediately block again on the mutex. I have not measured the performance difference on either type of implementation, but assuming (this is usually true) that time spent is dominated by syscalls, getting by with just one syscall instead of two should be a measurable performance gain. –  R.. Oct 27 '12 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Enter thread_handler1 and do cond_wait. From the man page i understood that cond_wait will immediatly release the lock atomically. So why are they releasing the lock again below in thread_handler1

Because the thread that is supposed to wait will release the lock when calling wait, but will then reacquire after it gets signaled (when it becomes available). That's why you need to rerelease it explicitly later.

After first thread has satisfied the condition and hits the condition signal I expected the thread which was blocking to execute its steps. Instead i got the printfs below the thread which executed the cond_signal. Why is this happening

Because calling signal does not switch the thread from the CPU. It will continue to run normally.

share|improve this answer
    
As for 2), also notice that calling pthread_signal does not release the lock you have acquired earlier. Therefore the waiting thread can not restart processing until the signaling thread calls pthread_unlock. –  Flavio Oct 26 '12 at 13:08
    
Thank you very much for the reply. Can you please explain why a thread has to do an explicit pthread_unlock later. I was not able to grasp the answer. –  CHID Oct 26 '12 at 13:12
    
@CHID: Do you mean question 1? –  Tudor Oct 26 '12 at 13:17
    
Yes Tudor. Because the thread that is supposed to wait will release the lock when calling wait, but will then reacquire it when it gets signaled. That's why you need to rerelease it explicitly later. To be specific, there is not pthread_lock. and the thread which was blocked "need not get scheduled immediatly" as the thread which issued the signal will be performing its own task. Wont this produce a race condition? –  CHID Oct 26 '12 at 13:18
1  
@CHID: What happens is the thread waits and it releases the lock. But after getting signaled to continue it is not allowed to keep executing until it reacquires the lock. So once the lock becomes available again, it will recquire it, continue executing, but it will then need to release it when it's done with it. –  Tudor Oct 26 '12 at 13:20

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