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I think that C++ supports something on the lines of :

Object objects[100];

This would instantiate a 100 objects, right? Is it possible to do this in Delphi (specifically 2007)? Something other than:

for i:=0 to 99 do
  currentObject = TObject.Create;

or using the Allocate function, with a passed size value a hundred times the TObject size, because that just allocates memory, it doesn't actually divide the memory and 'give' it to the objects. If my assumption that the c++ instantiation is instant rather than under-the-hood-iterative, I apologize.

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4  
I don't think you can simply say "TObject ObjList[100];" and you have created a 100 TObject's, you only have a list of 100 pointers that should be initialized to NIL|null and/or assigned an object to an item in list, so I think there's no quick way. –  ComputerSaysNo Oct 26 '12 at 13:23
3  
Any such syntax is likely to be sugar sprinkled on top of iterative instantiation. Is there a reason you need syntax like that, rather than iterating? –  Larry Lustig Oct 26 '12 at 13:30
3  
You'll still have to pay for the instantiation of the all the objects. no matter how that instantiation is triggered. The resources consumed by the loop are minimal. If performance is a problem and the objects are relatively simple, consider using Delphi records instead. –  Larry Lustig Oct 26 '12 at 14:03
2  
TObject* data[100]; in c++ allocates only array of pointers to objects. Anyway, you have to create object instances using data[i] = new TObject(); syntax (or somethink like that) as you do in Delphi, or any other language; –  teran Oct 26 '12 at 14:16
1  
@Vlad: yes, C++ does support Object objects[100], provided that Object is not a TObject descendant. TObject must be allocated on the heap, that is a Delphi requirement. Nothing else in C++ has that requirement. –  Remy Lebeau Oct 27 '12 at 4:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are looking for is impossible because

  • Delphi does not support static (stack allocated) objects.
  • Delphi objects do not have default constructors that can be automatically invoked by compiler.

So that is not a lack of 'sugar syntax'.


For the sake of complete disclosure:

  • Delphi also supports legacy 'old object model' (Turbo Pascal object model) which allows statically allocated objects;
  • Dynamic object allocation itself does not prevent automatic object instantiation syntax, but makes such a syntax undesirable;
  • Automatic object instantiation syntax is impossible because Delphi does not have default constructors: Delphi compiler never instantiate objects implicitly because it does not know what constructor to call.
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1  
I suppose asking for proof of this is ludicrous. I'll take your word, thanks! –  Goran_Mandic Oct 26 '12 at 13:42
1  
It's true that you cannot do what you want, but I don't think the reasoning in this answer is accurate. There's no reason why you could not implement a language extension that supported automatic instantiation of objects that lived on the heap. –  David Heffernan Oct 26 '12 at 13:48
1  
@DavidHeffernan - notice the second point. Delphi compiler never instantiate objects - it does not know what constructor to call. –  user246408 Oct 26 '12 at 13:55
1  
I would HATE any extension to Delphi that violated that rule. We create 'em and we free 'em, and we like it that way. Anybody who wants to start down the path to what the OP suggests is heading down the path towards managed languages, a path I hope Delphi never goes down. –  Warren P Oct 26 '12 at 14:11
1  
@Serg The second point is valid, but the first point seems not to be. –  David Heffernan Oct 26 '12 at 14:12

While you can't do what you want using objects, if your objects are relatively simple, you may be able to get what you want by using an array of records.

Records in Delphi can have properties (including setters and getters), and class and instance methods. They are created automatically when declared, so declaring an array of them will create them all without iterating.

For more info: http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/XE3/en/Structured_Types#Records_.28advanced.29.

(I'm not sure when the new functionality was added to Delphi, it may well be after the 2007 version).

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in bds 2006 records already can have methods.If someone would replace object to thingy in the question this would be the answer. –  balazs Oct 26 '12 at 20:09
    
This might help. Will look into it on Monday. Thanks, +1. –  Goran_Mandic Oct 27 '12 at 2:57

I don't know of any non-hacky way to do this besides iterating:

var
  MyObjects: array[0..99] of TMyObject;
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to 99 do
    MyObjects[i] := TMyObject.Create;
end;
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2  
That's all well and correct, but it's the opposite of what I asked for :) –  Goran_Mandic Oct 26 '12 at 13:28
1  
@Goran: No, it's the answer to Is it possible to do this in Delphi (specifically 2007)? amended with some valid Delphi syntax. :-) –  Uli Gerhardt Oct 26 '12 at 14:23
1  
No, Uli, it's not the answer to that. In that question, the word this referred to the task of allocating lots of objects without iterating. Your answer ignores that detail and is essentially no different from the Delphi code already given in the question. The correct answer to the question is no. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 26 '12 at 19:02

That declaration wouldn't create 100 objects, it would just give you an array of 100 object references that point to nothing useful.

Creating an object is a two step process. The first step is allocating memory (which your code also doesn't), the second step is calling the constructor (Create method) to initialize that memory, create additional objects, etc, etc.

The allocation part can be done without the loop, but the constructor needs to be called to intialize each instance.

Many VCL classes don't have an additional constructor. They just have the empty constructor that does nothing. In that case, there is no need to call it.

For instance, to fetch an array of stringlists, you can use the following code, adjusted from this example:

type
  TStringListArray = array of TStringList;v
var
  Instances: array of Byte;

function GetStringLists(Number: Integer): TStringListArray;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  // Allocate instance memory for all of them
  SetLength(Instances, Number * TStringList.InstanceSize);
  // Zero the memory.
  FillChar(Instances[0], Length(Instances), 0);
  // Allocate array for object references.
  SetLength(Result, Number);

  for i := 0 to High(Result) do
  begin
    // Store object reference.
    Result[i] := @Instances[i * TStringList.InstanceSize];
    // Set the right class.
    PPointer(Result[i])^ := TStringList;
    // Call the constructor. 
    Result[i].Create;
  end;
end;

And to get an array of 100 stringlists:

var
  x: TStringListArray;
begin
  x := GetStringLists(100);

So while this procedure may save you a neglectable amount of time, and may theoretically be more memory-efficient (less fragmentation), you will still need the loop. No easy way out.

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1  
Downvoter, care to motivate? –  GolezTrol Oct 26 '12 at 14:04
2  
I doubt you can free a single TStringList object - I don't know what FastMM reaction will be. –  user246408 Oct 26 '12 at 14:30
3  
@Serg Damn, you're right. Calling x[20].Free gives an instant access violation. :s This is not easily solved. You cannot call Free or Destroy. You can call CleanupInstance, but it doesn't call the overridden destructor that TStringList has. –  GolezTrol Oct 26 '12 at 14:34
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I fail to understand why a simple SetLength(x, 100) (x is TStringListArray) will not allocate an array of 100 TStringLists. I'm still staring at this code trying to figure out why this "hack" is needed. –  kobik Oct 26 '12 at 14:40
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Well, isn't your code calling Result[i].Create 100 times? so: SetLength(x, 100);, for i := 0 to High(x) do x[i] := TStringList.Create; will not create the same array? Maybe I need to ask my own question on SO... :) –  kobik Oct 26 '12 at 15:09

It is somewhat possible in Delphi (but is not very practical in a Delphi environment, unless you are writing a custom memory manager). Creating an object instance is a two-step process - allocating memory for the object, and constructing the object's members inside of that memory. There is nothing requiring the memory of a given object to be allocated individually. You can allocate a larger block of memory and construct multiple objects inside of that block, taking advantage of a feature of Delphi that calls a constructor like a normal method if it is called from an instance variable instead of a class type, eg:

var
  objects: array of Byte;
  obj: TSomeClass;
begin
  SetLength(objects, 100 * TSomeClass.InstanceSize); 
  FillChar(objects[0], 0, Length(objects));
  for i := 0 to 99 do
  begin
    obj := TSomeClass.InitInstance(@objects[i * TSomeClass.InstanceSize]));
    obj.Create;
  end;
  ...
  for i := 0 to 99 do
  begin
    obj := TSomeClass(@objects[i * TSomeClass.InstanceSize]);
    obj.CleanupInstance;
  end;
  SetLength(objects, 0);
end;

This is not much different than what C++ does behind the scenes when declaring an array of object instances, only C++ supports declaring the array statically and it will call the constructors and destructors automatically, whereas Delphi does not support that.

There are a number of third-party implementations that allow you to allocate objects on the stack or in user-defined buffers, such as:

Objects on the Stack: A Delphi Relic

Allocate objects on stack, at specified memory address, or through any memory manager

Just to name a couple.

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The FillChar is zeroing memory that is already zero –  David Heffernan Oct 27 '12 at 8:22
    
New memory that is allocated with SetLength() for a dynamic array is not guaranteed to be zero in older Delphi versions. It doesn't hurt to zero it manually. –  Remy Lebeau Oct 28 '12 at 23:43
    
Really? Which versions don't zero it? –  David Heffernan Oct 29 '12 at 8:05
    
According to D7 doc: "For a long-string or dynamic-array variable, SetLength reallocates the string or array referenced by S to the given length. Existing characters in the string or elements in the array are preserved, but the content of newly allocated space is undefined. The one exception is when increasing the length of a dynamic array in which the elements are types that must be initialized (strings, Variants, Variant arrays, or records that contain such types). When S is a dynamic array of types that must be initialized, newly allocated space is set to 0 or nil." –  Remy Lebeau Oct 29 '12 at 22:38
    
I just checked the implementation, though. New memory is always zero-initialized. Just goes to show you cannot always rely on documentation alone. –  Remy Lebeau Oct 29 '12 at 22:39

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