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What is the benefit of using singleton instead of global for database connections in PHP? I feel using singleton instead of global makes the code unnecessarily complex.

Code with Global

$conn = new PDO(...);

function getSomething()
{
    global $conn;
    .
    .
    .
}

Code with Singleton

class DB_Instance
{
    private static $db;

    public static function getDBO()
    {
    	if (!self::$db)
    		self::$db = new PDO(...);

    	return self::$db;
    }
}

function getSomething()
{
    $conn = DB_Instance::getDBO();
    .
    .
    .
}

If there's a better way of initializing database connection other than global or singleton, please mention it and describe the advantages it have over global or singleton.

share|improve this question
    
If you are planning to use PDO at custom session handlers you should be aware of some peculiarities: stackoverflow.com/questions/2595860/pdo-prepare-silently-fails –  Wabbitseason May 25 '10 at 13:20

9 Answers 9

up vote 69 down vote accepted

I know this is old, but Dr8k's answer was almost there.

When you are considering writing a piece of code, assume it's going to change. That doesn't mean that you're assuming the kinds of changes it will have hoisted upon it at some point in the future, but rather that some form of change will be made.

Make it a goal mitigate the pain of making changes in the future: a global is dangerous because it's hard to manage in a single spot. What if I want to make that database connection context aware in the future? What if I want it to close and reopen itself every 5th time it was used. What if I decide that in the interest of scaling my app I want to use a pool of 10 connections? Or a configurable number of connections?

A singleton factory gives you that flexibility. I set it up with very little extra complexity and gain more than just access to the same connection; I gain the ability to change how that connection is passed to me later on in a simple manner.

Note that I say singleton factory as opposed to simply singleton. There's precious little difference between a singleton and a global, true. And because of that, there's no reason to have a singleton connection: why would you spend the time setting that up when you could create a regular global instead?

What a factory gets you is a why to get connections, and a separate spot to decide what connections (or connection) you're going to get.

Example

class ConnectionFactory
{
    private static $factory;
    public static function getFactory()
    {
        if (!self::$factory)
            self::$factory = new ConnectionFactory(...);
        return self::$factory;
    }

    private $db;

    public function getConnection() {
        if (!$db)
            $db = new PDO(...);
        return $db;
    }
}

function getSomething()
{
    $conn = ConnectionFactory::getFactory()->getConnection();
    .
    .
    .
}

Then, in 6 months when your app is super famous and getting dugg and slashdotted and you decide you need more than a single connection, all you have to do is implement some pooling in the getConnection() method. Or if you decide that you want a wrapper that implements SQL logging, you can pass a PDO subclass. Or if you decide you want a new connection on every invocation, you can do do that. It's flexible, instead of rigid.

16 lines of code, including braces, which will save you hours and hours and hours of refactoring to something eerily similar down the line.

Note that I don't consider this "Feature Creep" because I'm not doing any feature implementation in the first go round. It's border line "Future Creep", but at some point, the idea that "coding for tomorrow today" is always a bad thing doesn't jive for me.

share|improve this answer
3  
Not sure, but I think you meant: public function getConnection() { if (!$this->db) $this->db = new PDO(...); return $this->db; } –  Dycey Aug 3 '10 at 13:51
    
Thanks! Would I lose any of the benefits of using this method by using return self::$factory->getConnection(); instead of return self::$factory; ? –  Nico Burns Oct 22 '10 at 17:29
2  
I'd like to use this code in a project I'm doing. Can I cite this page, and if so, what license is this text under? Is it CC-BY, BSD or something else? I've currently claimed this as "Unknown - believe Public Domain" but I'd like to attribute the correct license conditions on it. –  JonTheNiceGuy May 27 '11 at 14:44
2  
I think we should make "$db" "$this->db" in the getConnection() method, otherwise "private $db" variable "is not used", that is not officially referenced anywhere. –  developer10 Mar 2 at 18:48

I'm not sure I can answer your specific question, but wanted to suggest that global / singleton connection objects may not be the best idea if this if for a web-based system. DBMSs are generally designed to manage large numbers of unique connections in an efficient manner. If you are using a global connection object, then you are doing a couple of things:

  1. Forcing you pages to do all database connections sequentially and killing any attempts at asyncronous page loads.

  2. Potentially holding open locks on database elements longer than necessary, slowing down overall database performance.

  3. Maxing out the total number of simultaneous connections your database can support and blocking new users from accessing the resources.

I am sure there are other potential consequences as well. Remember, this method will attempt to sustain a database connection for every user accessing the site. If you only have one or two users, not a problem. If this is a public website and you want traffic then scalability will become an issue.

[EDIT]

In larger scaled situations, creating new connections everytime you hit the datase can be bad. However, the answer is not to create a global connection and reuse it for everything. The answer is connection pooling.

With connection pooling, a number of distinct connections are maintained. When a connection is required by the application the first available connection from the pool is retrieved and then returned to the pool once its job is done. If a connection is requested and none are available one of two things will happen: a) if the maximum number of allowed connection is not reached, a new connection is opened, or b) the application is forced to wait for a connection to become available.

Note: In .Net languages, connection pooling is handled by the ADO.Net objects by default (the connection string sets all the required information).

Thanks to Crad for commenting on this.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess using singleton gives me the advantage of initializing the connection as late as possible, while if I use global, I'd probably initialize nearly at the beginning of the script. Am I correct? –  Imran Sep 25 '08 at 1:11
    
Correct, if you were to go down this road the singleton would provide that advantage. –  Dr8k Sep 25 '08 at 1:25
    
Actually, that all depends upon scale. In large scale web deployments, massive amounts of DB connections are evil. This is why apps like pgBouncer exist for PostgreSQL and Java does resource pooling. –  Gavin M. Roy Sep 25 '08 at 2:13
    
True, but I think proper connection pooling is different to just using global conenction objects. Connection pooling still uses multiple connections, it just limits the maximum number and resuses them over time to allieviate setup overhead. –  Dr8k Sep 25 '08 at 2:48
4  
Note that "global" in the case of PHP doesn't make the variable global across PHP pages. It just means that it can be accessed from within functions. –  Ates Goral Oct 20 '08 at 19:59

The singleton method was created to make sure there was only one instance of any class. But, because people use it as a way to shortcut globalizing, it becomes known as lazy and/or bad programming.

Therefore, I would ignore global and Singleton since both are not really OOP.

What you were looking for is dependency injection.

You can check on easy to read PHP based information related to dependency injection (with examples) at http://components.symfony-project.org/dependency-injection/trunk/book/01-Dependency-Injection

share|improve this answer

Both patterns achieve the same net effect, providing one single access point for your database calls.

In terms of specific implementation, the singleton has a small advantage of not initiating a database connection until at least one of your other methods requests it. In practice in most applications I've written, this doesn't make much of a difference, but it's a potential advantage if you have some pages/execution paths which don't make any database calls at all, since those pages won't ever request a connection to the database.

One other minor difference is that the global implementation may trample over other variable names in the application unintentionally. It's unlikely that you'll ever accidentally declare another global $db reference, though it's possible that you could overwrite it accidentally ( say, you write if($db = null) when you meant to write if($db == null). The singleton object prevents that.

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If you're not going to use a persistent connection, and there are cases for not doing that, I find a singleton to be conceptually more palatable than a global in OO design.

In a true OO architecture, a singleton is more effective than creating a new instance the object each time.

share|improve this answer
4  
A singleton IS a global! –  aehlke Sep 2 '10 at 21:08

On the given example, I see no reason to use singletons. As a rule of thumb if my only concern is to allow a single instance of an object, if the language allows it, I prefer to use globals

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In general I would use a singleton for a database connection... You don't want to create a new connection everytime you need to interact to the database... This might hurt perfomance and bandwidth of your network... Why create a new one, when there's one available... Just my 2 cents...

RWendi

share|improve this answer
    
With initializing the connection in global scope, I'm initializing the connection once per page, and using that global variable in functions that need to interact with database. –  Imran Sep 25 '08 at 1:18
    
Using a singleton for a database connection is not the same as not re-creating the connection upon each interaction with the DBMS. A singleton is just that; one instance of a given class, and the only one allowed to exist globally. You might need to connect to different databases at once. –  Rob Sep 25 '08 at 1:28
    
i was refering to a singleton class that manages connections to the database. I dont see the point of creating a new connection object everytime you want to interact to a dbms. Of course if you need to connect to different database at once, you may need to create another connection object. –  RWendi Sep 25 '08 at 1:52

It is quite simple. Never use global OR Singleton.

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4  
When it comes to Singleton pattern, always say never –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 25 '08 at 1:02
3  
What if you want more than one log provider? Who says I can't log to a file, and the console? –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 25 '08 at 1:03
2  
So you would then combine one anti-pattern (Singleton) with another (God Object) –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 25 '08 at 1:52
3  
Yes. And so do the designers of every major OOP language, by permitting global class objects. If you're a monotheist and you want an object to represent God, then what you're looking for is a Singleton God Object. Anything else is incorrect. –  Steve Jessop Sep 25 '08 at 1:57
4  
If I was a montheist and I wanted to create a God object, I might specify to use a MonotheistAbstractFactory Pattern to create my God Object? This would leave open the possiblility for polytheistic users to also use my program by specifying a PolytheistAbstractfactory. –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 25 '08 at 2:36
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/os-php-designptrns/
<?php
require_once("DB.php");

class DatabaseConnection
{
  public static function get()
  {
    static $db = null;
    if ( $db == null )
      $db = new DatabaseConnection();
    return $db;
  }

  private $_handle = null;

  private function __construct()
  {
    $dsn = 'mysql://root:password@localhost/photos';
    $this->_handle =& DB::Connect( $dsn, array() );
  }

  public function handle()
  {
    return $this->_handle;
  }
}

print( "Handle = ".DatabaseConnection::get()->handle()."\n" );
print( "Handle = ".DatabaseConnection::get()->handle()."\n" );
?>
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question. –  glenneroo Aug 1 at 14:17

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