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UPDATED QUESTION Ok, so I have a file with lines like this:

44:)   2.884E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  9.990E+02
45:)   2.884E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  9.990E+02
1:)   3.593E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  1.000E+05
2:)   3.593E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  1.000E+05

The numbers in the first column run from 1 to x (in this case 45) and then starts over at 1 lots of times. I want to move some of the columns to a separate file. The indexes of the columns I want to move is stored in the variable/array $selected_columns (in this case 2, 5 and 8) and the number of columns I want to move is stored in $number_of_columns (in this case 3).

I then want to create 45 files, one for the selected columns for all 1:), one for the selected columns for all 2:) and so forth. I want to make this as general as possible since both the number of columns and the number running from 1 to x will change. The number x is always known and the columns to extract are chosen by the user.

ORIGINAL QUESTION:

I have a string fetched by egrep. Then I want to print some of the columns (words) in that string. The position (column index) is known in a list in my bash script. Currently it looks like this:

line=$(egrep " ${i}:\)" $1)

for ((j=1; j<=$number_of_columns; j++))
do
    awk $line -v current_column=${selected_columns[$j]} '{printf $(current_column)}' > "history_files/history${i}"
done

where number_of_columns is the number of columns that are to be printed and selected_columns contain the corresponding indexes of those columns. As an example number_of_columns = 3 and selected_columns = [2 5 8], so I want to print word number 2, 5 and 8 from the string line to the file history${i}.

I am not sure what is wrong, but this has been done with some trial and error. The current error is awk: cannot open 0.000E+00 (No such file or directory).

Any help is appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
The egrep line works fine btw, this code is inside another loop. –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In:

awk $line -v ...

$line holds the output of a grep, probably not something awk expects to see on it's command line. Also,m this:

for ((j=1; j<=$number_of_columns; j++))
do
    anything > "history_files/history${i}"
done

will cause you to overwrite the history file every time through the loop. I don't know what you really wanted there.

You have a slew of other issues with your script, though. You said "As an example number_of_columns = 3 and selected_columns = [2 5 8], so I want to print word number 2, 5 and 8 from the string line to the file history${i}.".

That's trivial entirely in awk and you don't need to do a "grep" outside of awk either, so you could just do the whole thing as:

awk -v pat=" ${i}:\)" -v selected_columns="$selected_columns" '

BEGIN { number_of_columns = split(selected_columns,selected_columnsA) }

$0 ~ pat {
    sep=""
    for (j=1;j<=number_of_columns;j++) {
        current_column = selected_columnsA[j]
        printf "%s,%s",sep,lineA[current_column]
        sep = "\t"
    }
    print ""
}
' "$1" > "history_files/history${i}"

If that doesn't work for you, let's fix THAT instead of trying to fix the original script. Sounds like you have enclosing loop outside of the above, chances are that could just be part of the awk script as well.

EDIT based on updated OP:

I've added lots of comments but let me know if you have questions:

$ cat file
44:)   2.884E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  9.990E+02
45:)   2.884E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  9.990E+02
1:)   3.593E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  1.000E+05
2:)   3.593E-02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  2.780E+02  0.000E+00  0.000E+00  1.000E+05
$
$ cat tst.sh
selected_columns=(2 5 8)

selCols="${selected_columns[@]}"

awk -v selCols="$selCols" '

BEGIN { # Executed before the first line of the input file is read

    # Split the string of selected column numbers, selCols, into
    # an array selColsA where selColsA[1] has the value of the
    # first space-separated sub-string of selCols (i.e. the number
    # of the first column to print). Note that we dont need the
    # number of columns passed into the script as a result of
    # splitting the string is the count of elements put into the
    # array as a return code from the split() builtin function.
    numCols = split(selCols,selColsA)
}

{ # Executed once for every line of the input file

    # Create a numerix suffix like "45" from the first column
    # in the current line of the input file, e.g. "45:)" by
    # just getting rid of all non-digit characters.
    sfx = $1
    gsub(/[^[:digit:]]/,"",sfx)

    # Create the name of the output file by attaching that
    # numeric suffix to the base value for all output files.
    #histfile = "history_files/history" sfx
    histfile = "tmp" sfx


    # Loop through every column we want printed. selColsA[<index>]
    # gives us a column number which we can then use to access the
    # columns of the current line. Awk uses the builtin variable $0
    # to hold the current line, and it autolatically splits it so
    # that $1 holds the first column, $2 is the second, etc. So
    # if selColsA[1] has the value 3, then $(selColsA[1]) would be
    # the value of the 3rd column of the current input line.
    sep=""
    for (i=1;i<=numCols;i++) {
        curCol = selColsA[i]

        # Print the current column, prefixed by a tab for all but
        # the first column, and without a terminating newline so the
        # next column gets appended to the end of the current output line.
        # Note that in awk "> file" has different semantics from shell
        # and opens the file for writing the first time the line is hit
        # like "> file" in shell, but then appends to it every time its
        # hit afterwards, like ">> file" in shell.
        printf "%s%s",sep,$curCol > histfile
        sep = "\t"
    }
    # Add a newline to the end of the current output line
    print "" > histfile
}

' "$1"
$
$ ./tst.sh file
$
$ cat tmp1
3.593E-02       2.780E+02       1.000E+05
$ cat tmp2
3.593E-02       2.780E+02       1.000E+05
$ cat tmp44
2.884E-02       2.780E+02       9.990E+02
$ cat tmp45
2.884E-02       2.780E+02       9.990E+02

By the way, I used the words "column" and "line" above for your benefit since you're just learning, but FYI the awk terminology is actually "field" and "record".

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are probably right that this can be done with awk. My awk skills are unfortunately very poor. I have a file with lines like this: 1:) 1.655E-02 0.000E+00 0.000E+00 2.780E+02 0.000E+00 0.000E+00 1.000E+05. The lines have arbitrary number of columns and lines (in this case running from 1:) to 45:) and then starts over from 1:) lots of times. I will try this out now and see what happens. –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 14:25
    
awk is absolutely, defnitely THE tool you want to use for this. Once you understand a couple of basic concepts, i.e. that there is an implicit "while read line" loop around the whole script body, and that the body is made up of <condition>{<action>} segments, it's very easy to pick up. I'll be happy to talk you through how do do what you want in awk. Just edit your original post to show some small (10 lines or less) sample input and expected output from that input. –  Ed Morton Oct 26 '12 at 14:29
    
I have updated now. I hope the information is sufficient, let me know if you need anything else. I appreciate you taking your time! :) –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 14:44
    
I've updated my answer with a script that should do what you want, let me know if you have questions. –  Ed Morton Oct 26 '12 at 15:15
    
This looks awesome. A couple of questions: 1. The gsub(/[^[:digit:]]/,"",sfx) does not remove colons or paranthesis. Is there something missing there? 2. Does the numCols = split(selCols,selColsA) work if selected_columns are an array of numbers as well, or does it have to be a string? There is currently no output to the history files. –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 15:45

I guess, you must change the awk line to:

echo $line | awk -v current_column=${selected_columns[$j]} ...

For your updated question, if the columns are in an array $selected_columns. In your example file, the columns are separated by multiple adjacent spaces. If this is not true for your original file you can omit the sed before grep.

columns=`echo ${selected_columns[*]} | sed 's/ /,/g'`
for i in `seq 45`; do
    sed -e 's/  */ /g' file | grep "^$i:)" | cut -d' ' -f $columns >file-$i
done
share|improve this answer
    
This produces errors like "awk: program limit exceeded: maximum number of fields size=32767". Is there some way I can work around this issue? –  Krøllebølle Oct 26 '12 at 15:10
    
The problem is that $line wasn't quoted so every line of the input file that matched the grep got concatenated into a single line before being passed to awk. Always quote your shell variables unless you have a specific reason not to. Seems like I'm saying that a lot lately... –  Ed Morton Oct 26 '12 at 15:12

I think you can use cut to do what you are trying to do, ie

echo "$line" | cut -d" " -f2 -f5 -f8 > "history_files/history${i}"

-d is your delimiter, I used spaces to test, hence the " "

hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Always quote your shell variables unless you have a good reason not to. If there was a column in the input file that was empty then the above would delete it and move every subsequent value up to the previous column index. Try line="a b c" vs line="a c" (a space space c) where the latter just means the empty string is in the 2nd column as echo $line | cut -d" " -f2 vs echo "$line" | cut -d" " -f2. The former will incorrectly print "c" while the latter will print the correct value of "". –  Ed Morton Oct 26 '12 at 14:42
    
Thanks Ed, you are absolutely correct. Edited in line. –  djjolicoeur Oct 26 '12 at 14:44

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