Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote the following module but am not sure how to refer to the "last" and "head" nodes. As well as storing the address of the next node in "{nextNode}" in the previous node.

I am trying to save the reference of the class when storing it but later it's complaining: "Not a HASH reference at List.pm"; which I understand why but am not sure how the syntax would be.

If I de-reference $head and $last ($$last->{nextNode} = \$class) then I think it's using the actual name of my class; List and not the previous object like I want to.

package List;

my $head = undef;
my $last = undef;

sub new {
    my $class = shift;

    # init the head of the list
    if ($head == undef) {
    $head = \$class;
    print "updated head to:$head", "\n";
    }

    $last = \$class;
    $last->{nextNode} = \$class; # update previous node to point on this new one    

    print "updated last to:$last", "\n";
    my $self = {};
    $self->{value} = shift;    
    $self->{nextNode} = ""; # reset next to nothing since this node is last

    return bless $self, $class;
}

Thanks guys

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should be storing $self everywhere instead of \$class. Storing $class is simply storing the name of the class, not the object itself.

Also, for $self->{nextNode} I'd store an undef instead of a blank string. Or better yet, simply don't create it at all and use exists when checking if it is there.

share|improve this answer
    
Problem solved. Thanks very much!!! –  Yaniv Ben David Oct 27 '12 at 23:44

You're over thinking it. If you use an array for your list instead of a hash, you don't need to worry about the head and last. The head of an array is $array[0] and the last member is $array[-1]. Simple and easy to do.

Here's a quick standard class definition for defining a list. I've only defined a constructor (the new subroutine) and one method (the list).

package Local::List;

sub new {
   my $class = shift;

   my $self = {};
   bless $self, $class;
   $self->list([]);
}

sub list {
   my $self = shift;
   my $list_ref = shift;

   if (ref $list_ref ne "ARRAY) {
       return;
   }
   if (defined $list_ref) {
       $self->{LIST} = $list_ref;
   }
   if wantarray {
      return $self->{LIST};
   }
}

The first thing: Use the same standard names everyone else uses. Use new for the constructor. When I try to look at the documentation on how to use your class, I can search for the word new and know that's how I create a class object. Also, use the variable names $class and $self. That's what everyone else does, so it's easy to know what's going on.

Notice in my new subroutine, the first item passed is the name of the class while the first item passed to my other subroutines is a reference to my class object (i.e. $self). That's probably the hardest thing to understand about classes.

Notice in new, I immediately create my $self and bless it. That way, I can call my other subroutines (my methods) to do the setting for me. This way, my constructor doesn't know how my class is structured. This has a lot of advantages:

  • When (not if) I modify my class, I don't have to modify the constructor.
  • My constructor is always in sync with all of my methods.
  • I don't have to know how my class object is structured when I start defining the class. I can start writing my class without worrying about all those dirty details on how it'll work.

Notice that the list subroutine (or method) can either set a list or return a list. It's much easier if you use the same subroutine to set or get the value. Also in your method subroutines, use a blank return when your method function returns an error. Otherwise, always return something. That makes it easy to test to see if a method failed or not.

Let's look at some of the other methods you probably want to have. Let's have all the four standard list functions:

  • push
  • pop
  • shift
  • unshift

Here's an example:

sub push {
    my $self = shift;
    my $member = shift;

    if (not defined $member) {
        return;
    }

    my $list_ref = $self->list;
    my $return = push @{ $list_ref }, $member;
    $self->list($list_ref);

    return $return;
}

Wow, that's simple. Notice that the pop doesn't know what my class looks like. It used the list method to retrieve a list reference. Then it used the builtin push method to push a member onto the list. I save that return value, and that's what I'll return. I'm not even sure what push returns. All I know is that push returns something if it succeeds. (Yes, I know it returns the number of items in the list).

The other three functions are more or less the same. Here's a few more:

  • current
  • splice
  • next
  • previous
  • head
  • last

All you need to do for current is to store the current value. Use the same function to set and get the value. Notice that my list method or my push method, or my new constructor knows or care how you store it. Nor, do our next and previous methods. All they need to do is increment or decrement the value of current and store it back using the current method subroutine:

sub next {
   my $self = shift

   my @list = $self->list;  #Returns a list;
   my $current = $self->current;
   my $list_size = $#list;

   if ($current eq $list_size) {
      return;   #Can't return a value after the end of the list!
   }

   $current++;  #Increment the value;
   my $value = $list[$current];  #I'll return this
   $self->current($current) #Store the new current
   return $value;
}

And, now to the basis of your question: Getting the last and head values of the list. Here's last

sub last {
   my $self = shift;

   my $list_ref = $self->list;
   return ${ $list_ref }[-1];
}

And a quick copy and paste will give me head:

sub head {
   my $self = shift;

   my $list_ref = $self->list;
   return ${ $list_ref }[0];
}

That's it! All that worrying you were doing was for naught.

Sorry for the long post. I just wanted to emphasize that object oriented programming in Perl isn't that tricky as long as you follow a few simple guide lines.

(Simple? What about use Moose; No, I said simple!). ;-)

share|improve this answer
1  
Your solution is very interesting. Thanks for the hard work (simple for you ;) ). Just one question though: what if you want to store more than one value? Let's say you want to store a phone book... –  Yaniv Ben David Oct 29 '12 at 3:00
    
@YanivBenDavid A phone book as a single value for a list member or storing a phone book in a list? Let's say you want to store a phone book in a list (or maybe a phonebook entry). There's nothing in my method that restricts you from storing a reference to your phonebook or even better a phone book object from your phonebook class. If you're talking about storing a list of phone book entries, you can use the Local::List->list method to set the entire list to be your phonebook. –  David W. Oct 29 '12 at 14:04

I just want to post my final working version for the record and for your feedback/comments. Thanks again!!

package List;

my $head = undef;
my $last = undef;

sub new {
    my ($class, $val) = @_;
    my $self = {};

    # init the head of the list
    if (!defined $head) {
    $head = $self;
    print "updated the head of the list ($head)" . "\n";
    }
    else {
    $last->{nextNode} = $self; # update previous node to point on this new one
    }

    $last = $self; # this object is now the last one

    $self->{value} = $val; # store the value
    $self->{nextNode} = undef; # reset next to nothing since this node is last

    return bless $self, $class;
}

sub setVal {
    my ($class, $val) = @_;
    $class->{value} = $val;
}

sub getVal {
    my $class = shift;
    print $class->{value};
}

sub getNext {
    my $class = shift;
    return $class->{nextNode};
}

# return true if this is the last node, otherwise false.
sub isLast {
    my $class = shift;
    return 1 if !defined $class->{nextNode};
    return 0;
}

sub getLast {
    return $last;
}

sub getHead {
    return $head;
}

# looping through all the list and printing the values
sub showList {
    my $node = $head; # set temp node to the head

    while ( !$node->isLast() ) {
    print $node->{value} . "\n";
    $node = $node->{nextNode};
    }

    # printing last value. (should be defined but I check it just in case)
    print $node->{value} . " (last)\n" if defined $node->{value};
}

1;

Script:

my $n0 = new List(4);
my $n1 = new List(8);
my $n2 = new List(9);
my $n3 = new List(3);
my $n4 = new List(1);
my $n5 = new List(0);
my $n6 = new List(5);
print "\nShow list: \n";
$n2->showList(); # any object will print the list
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.