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I'm possibly missing something that is very obvious, but I'm not getting nowhere with this problem.

I'm simple trying to set a value of a variable after getting the value from a json feed.

I'm using jquery to get a jsonp feed and then store the value in a variable that I can use later, but its not working and the value doesn't get stored. If I console.log the value it returns it.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){
    serverip = "<?php echo $_SERVER['SERVER_ADDR']; ?>";
    stream_domain = "";

    $.ajax({url: 'http://load.cache.is/inspired.php?ip=' + serverip, dataType:'jsonp',
      success:  function(data){
        $.each(data, function(key, val) {
            if (key == serverip){
               stream_domain = val;
               console.log("val: " + val);
            }
        });
      }
    });

    console.log(stream_domain);
});

Here is the same code on jsfiddle.net

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1  
When you say that you are using the value later, do you mean in the same block of code or within another event? If it is in the same block of code, then you need to put that code in the success method of the .ajax() call. –  JoeFletch Oct 26 '12 at 13:45
    
That makes perfect sense, I should have known that :) –  einar Oct 26 '12 at 13:47
1  
Normally you could force this to work by adding async: false to your $.ajax parameters. However, that's not supported with jsonp. –  Blazemonger Oct 26 '12 at 13:48
    
Thank you for that information, I did not know that. In reality I have never really understood async but now I'm staring to get it. –  einar Oct 26 '12 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are making an asynchronous request. So your code which appends the HTML execute before the success does which assigns the variable.

The code following the ajax request executes immidiatly after the request is made. So if you require the response data then you should move your append code to be executed from the success method similar to this:

if (key == serverip){
    stream_domain = val;
    console.log("val: " + val);
    $("<span>" + val + "</span>").appendTo(".json");
    $("<span>" + stream_domain + "</span>").appendTo(".variable");
}

DEMO

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1  
OP could also keep his code tidy by calling a function inside the $.ajax callback, and putting whatever he wants to run in that separate function. jsfiddle.net/mblase75/vSmjZ/4 –  Blazemonger Oct 26 '12 at 13:49
1  
@Blazemonger: Absolutly agree with you. I only answered why the code did what it did and suggested a solution. Coding standards and best practices on separations of concerns etc... is up to the OP. But yes, now that we have the red-green light, the next step for OP is to apply good coding standards :) –  François Wahl Oct 26 '12 at 13:51
    
When you say it it makes perfect sens, that's the way I have always done it, I'm not sure why I didn't get to that conclusion while writing this code. Possibly because it started out without needing an ajax call and I wrote that later and tried to add the value this way. –  einar Oct 26 '12 at 13:53
1  
@einar: Happens all the time when looking at something for to long. Sometimes all it takes is a fresh pair of eyes. I +1ed your question as I think it is a usefull question and I'm sure another person will find this question usefull in a similar situations. –  François Wahl Oct 26 '12 at 13:55

The ajax call is asynchronous, so the timeline of the events is :

  1. make ajax call
  2. console.log
  3. ajax call success, variable assign

Wait for the success event before using the variable. Here is your updated jsFiddle where I've added a function called in the success callback function:

    function continueWorking(){            
        console.log(stream_domain);
        $("<span>" + stream_domain + "</span>").appendTo(".variable");
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Of course it is, what the hell is wrong with me to day, I should know this :) Thank you. –  einar Oct 26 '12 at 13:48

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