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I have a hierarchy:

class ICommand
{
    public:
        virtual void start() = 0;
};

class IExtendedCommand : public ICommand
{
    public:
        virtual void doSomethingElse() = 0;
};

class ConcreteCommand : public ICommand
{
    public:
        virtual void start() {};
}    
class ExtendedConcreteCommand : public ConcreteCommand, public IExtendedCommand
{
    public:
        virtual void doSomethingElse() {};
}

ICommand and IExtendedCommand objects are being created by factory.

For some reason when compiler says that all of ICommand's methods are pure within ExtendedConcreteCommand...

Any ideas why and how to solve this?

PS: Yes I'm porting my Android app to C++/Qt (which I haven't used for 3 years). Anyway I'd like to hear how you would cope with this.

EDIT:

What I'm porting is a remote control application for MPC and VLC. The idea is to create commands that can be sent to the player through a factory. Factory returns a pointer to an object that implements ICommand. So by switching factory implementations different commands can be created. ICommand declares all the main methods and signals. IExtendedCommand adds some generic info across players. So what I'd like to do is instantiate IExtendedCommand through a factory, set some properties and then launch it with start() method. Also I'd like to reuse ConcreteCommand's functionality. That leads to the issue I described.

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4  
this is what happen when you mix Java and C++ :/ –  111111 Oct 26 '12 at 14:11
2  
You're going to need to use en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_inheritance . Generally when you see this, it's a good idea to rethink the design. –  Chad Oct 26 '12 at 14:11
3  
My eyes bleed. That's like looking at Java code with C++ syntax :-( –  Aniket Oct 26 '12 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't have a diamond. You have this:

   +----------------------------------- missing start() !
   V
pv start()     pv doSomethingElse()     concrete doSomethingElse()

ICommand  ---> IExtendedCommand   ---\
                                      > ExtendedConcreteCommand
ICommand  ---> ConcreteCommand    ---/

pv start()     concrete start()

That means that you have two base classes of type ICommand, and you need to override both their pure methods. But only ConcreteCommand overrides the "bottom" version of start, and the other one remains unoverridden.

If you want an actual diamond, you need to make the ICommand base class virtual by using virtual inheritance: class IExtendedCommand : virtual public ICommand, and likewise for ConcreteCommand. Alternatively, you can provide another overrider for start in ExtendedConcreteCommand.

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Implementing start in ExtendedConcreteCommand like this start() { ConcreteCommand::start(); } worked. But is it ok to do this? And another thing - when I try to return ExtendedConcreteCommand from a factory method that returns ICommand I get ambiguity compile error. –  Kostia Dombrovsky Oct 26 '12 at 14:31
    
@KostiaDombrovsky: Whether it's OK depends on what your design requirements are! Do you understand how the inheritance works, and what the difference between virtual and non-virtual inheritance is? Only you can make that decision. Feel free to elaborate on your needs in the question. –  Kerrek SB Oct 26 '12 at 15:13
    
updated question description. –  Kostia Dombrovsky Oct 26 '12 at 15:53

If I understand your notation, ExtendedConcreteCommand is supposed to be a concrete class, which means that somewhere you tried to do

ExtendedConcreteCommand command;

In the code you uploaded though, ExtendedConcreteCommand is a pure virtual class because the method IExtendedCommand::start() is pure virtual.

Actually, diamond inheritance is poor coding practice and should be avoided. If you insist in doing this, to avoid having compiler issues you have to define IExtendedCommand::start(). By modifying your class to

class IExtendedCommand : public ICommand
{
    public:
        virtual void doSomethingElse() = 0;
        virtual void start() {};
};

your code compiles.

You can also use virtual inheritance. In that case you will have only one instance of ICommand, and a real diamond. In your example, you have two instances of ICommand: one coming from IExtendedCommand and another coming from ConcreteCommand.

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Just inherit virtually from the interface.

That does have a runtime cost.

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