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Retreive my number after make it in Byte[]

I want to retrive a basic number after make it in Byte[]

 public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
       LinkedList<Byte> s1 = new LinkedList<Byte>();
       String a = "0.111112345";
       for (byte bb : a.getBytes()) {
            s1.add(bb);
            }
 //how to retrieve "0.111112345"; from s1 ?
}
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marked as duplicate by bestsss, Tomasz Nurkiewicz, maba, Ed Staub, C. A. McCann Oct 26 '12 at 16:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What have you tried? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 26 '12 at 15:58

4 Answers 4

Firstly, don't use getBytes() without specifying an encoding - it will use the platform default encoding, which is almost never what you want.

Given that you've got bytes which are the binary representation of a text representation of a number, it sounds like you should basically convert it back to a string, then use Double.parseDouble(...) or new BigDecimal(...).

If you'd got some "genuinely binary" representation of the number, that would be a different matter - but this is a text representation at heart.

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In my algorithm i must to use LinkedList<Byte> ! –  Mehdi Oct 26 '12 at 16:00
    
@Mehdi: Then convert the LinkedList<Byte> back to a byte[], then back to a String. Why do you have to use a LinkedList<Byte> anyway, and do you really need to use a representation based on text? –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '12 at 16:01
    
Can you given to me an example please to convert the LinkedList<Byte> to a byte[], then to a String and finaly retreive my basic number ?. –  Mehdi Oct 26 '12 at 16:03
    
@Mehdi: Well this is starting to sound very much like a request to just do your homework for you. What have you tried, and how far did you get? –  Jon Skeet Oct 26 '12 at 20:08

If what you want is convert the s1 collection to a representation of the number, do this:

String number = "";
for(byte b : s1)
    number += (char) b;
System.out.println("The number is:" + number);

And if you want in a number type:

double dbl = Double.parseDouble(number);
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Double number = Double.parseDouble(new String(s1.toArray(new Byte[s1.size])))

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You are not getting it. It is not that simple. Problem in your code is you are converting String to bytes. Just to give you an example

  System.out.println(Arrays.toString("10".getBytes()));

Will print [49, 48] this is because encoding so there is no direct mapping from String to Bytes

Below is Code from FloatingDecimal which does the job as you can see it is far too difficult than what you are doing right now.

     999       public static FloatingDecimal
     1000       readJavaFormatString( String in ) throws NumberFormatException {
     1001           boolean isNegative = false;
     1002           boolean signSeen   = false;
     1003           int     decExp;
     1004           char    c;
     1005   
     1006       parseNumber:
     1007           try{
     1008               in = in.trim(); // don't fool around with white space.
     1009                               // throws NullPointerException if null
     1010               int l = in.length();
     1011               if ( l == 0 ) throw new NumberFormatException("empty String");
     1012               int i = 0;
     1013               switch ( c = in.charAt( i ) ){
     1014               case '-':
     1015                   isNegative = true;
     1016                   //FALLTHROUGH
     1017               case '+':
     1018                   i++;
     1019                   signSeen = true;
     1020               }
     1021   
     1022               // Check for NaN and Infinity strings
     1023               c = in.charAt(i);
     1024               if(c == 'N' || c == 'I') { // possible NaN or infinity
     1025                   boolean potentialNaN = false;
     1026                   char targetChars[] = null;  // char array of "NaN" or "Infinity"
     1027   
     1028                   if(c == 'N') {
     1029                       targetChars = notANumber;
     1030                       potentialNaN = true;
     1031                   } else {
     1032                       targetChars = infinity;
     1033                   }
     1034   
     1035                   // compare Input string to "NaN" or "Infinity"
     1036                   int j = 0;
     1037                   while(i < l && j < targetChars.length) {
     1038                       if(in.charAt(i) == targetChars[j]) {
     1039                           i++; j++;
     1040                       }
     1041                       else // something is amiss, throw exception
     1042                           break parseNumber;
     1043                   }
     1044   
     1045                   // For the candidate string to be a NaN or infinity,
     1046                   // all characters in input string and target char[]
     1047                   // must be matched ==> j must equal targetChars.length
     1048                   // and i must equal l
     1049                   if( (j == targetChars.length) && (i == l) ) { // return NaN or infinity
     1050                       return (potentialNaN ? new FloatingDecimal(Double.NaN) // NaN has no sign
     1051                               : new FloatingDecimal(isNegative?
     1052                                                     Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY:
     1053                                                     Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY)) ;
     1054                   }
     1055                   else { // something went wrong, throw exception
     1056                       break parseNumber;
     1057                   }
     1058   
     1059               } else if (c == '0')  { // check for hexadecimal floating-point number
     1060                   if (l > i+1 ) {
     1061                       char ch = in.charAt(i+1);
     1062                       if (ch == 'x' || ch == 'X' ) // possible hex string
     1063                           return parseHexString(in);
     1064                   }
     1065               }  // look for and process decimal floating-point string
     1066   
     1067               char[] digits = new char[ l ];
     1068               int    nDigits= 0;
     1069               boolean decSeen = false;
     1070               int decPt = 0;
     1071               int nLeadZero = 0;
     1072               int nTrailZero= 0;
     1073           digitLoop:
     1074               while ( i < l ){
     1075                   switch ( c = in.charAt( i ) ){
     1076                   case '0':
     1077                       if ( nDigits > 0 ){
     1078                           nTrailZero += 1;
     1079                       } else {
     1080                           nLeadZero += 1;
     1081                       }
     1082                       break; // out of switch.
     1083                   case '1':
     1084                   case '2':
     1085                   case '3':
     1086                   case '4':
     1087                   case '5':
     1088                   case '6':
     1089                   case '7':
     1090                   case '8':
     1091                   case '9':
     1092                       while ( nTrailZero > 0 ){
     1093                           digits[nDigits++] = '0';
     1094                           nTrailZero -= 1;
     1095                       }
     1096                       digits[nDigits++] = c;
     1097                       break; // out of switch.
     1098                   case '.':
     1099                       if ( decSeen ){
     1100                           // already saw one ., this is the 2nd.
     1101                           throw new NumberFormatException("multiple points");
     1102                       }
     1103                       decPt = i;
     1104                       if ( signSeen ){
     1105                           decPt -= 1;
     1106                       }
     1107                       decSeen = true;
     1108                       break; // out of switch.
     1109                   default:
     1110                       break digitLoop;
     1111                   }
     1112                   i++;
     1113               }
     1114               /*
     1115                * At this point, we've scanned all the digits and decimal
     1116                * point we're going to see. Trim off leading and trailing
     1117                * zeros, which will just confuse us later, and adjust
     1118                * our initial decimal exponent accordingly.
     1119                * To review:
     1120                * we have seen i total characters.
     1121                * nLeadZero of them were zeros before any other digits.
     1122                * nTrailZero of them were zeros after any other digits.
     1123                * if ( decSeen ), then a . was seen after decPt characters
     1124                * ( including leading zeros which have been discarded )
     1125                * nDigits characters were neither lead nor trailing
     1126                * zeros, nor point
     1127                */
     1128               /*
     1129                * special hack: if we saw no non-zero digits, then the
     1130                * answer is zero!
     1131                * Unfortunately, we feel honor-bound to keep parsing!
     1132                */
     1133               if ( nDigits == 0 ){
     1134                   digits = zero;
     1135                   nDigits = 1;
     1136                   if ( nLeadZero == 0 ){
     1137                       // we saw NO DIGITS AT ALL,
     1138                       // not even a crummy 0!
     1139                       // this is not allowed.
     1140                       break parseNumber; // go throw exception
     1141                   }
     1142   
     1143               }
     1144   
     1145               /* Our initial exponent is decPt, adjusted by the number of
     1146                * discarded zeros. Or, if there was no decPt,
     1147                * then its just nDigits adjusted by discarded trailing zeros.
     1148                */
     1149               if ( decSeen ){
     1150                   decExp = decPt - nLeadZero;
     1151               } else {
     1152                   decExp = nDigits+nTrailZero;
     1153               }
     1154   
     1155               /*
     1156                * Look for 'e' or 'E' and an optionally signed integer.
     1157                */
     1158               if ( (i < l) &&  (((c = in.charAt(i) )=='e') || (c == 'E') ) ){
     1159                   int expSign = 1;
     1160                   int expVal  = 0;
     1161                   int reallyBig = Integer.MAX_VALUE / 10;
     1162                   boolean expOverflow = false;
     1163                   switch( in.charAt(++i) ){
     1164                   case '-':
     1165                       expSign = -1;
     1166                       //FALLTHROUGH
     1167                   case '+':
     1168                       i++;
     1169                   }
     1170                   int expAt = i;
     1171               expLoop:
     1172                   while ( i < l  ){
     1173                       if ( expVal >= reallyBig ){
     1174                           // the next character will cause integer
     1175                           // overflow.
     1176                           expOverflow = true;
     1177                       }
     1178                       switch ( c = in.charAt(i++) ){
     1179                       case '0':
     1180                       case '1':
     1181                       case '2':
     1182                       case '3':
     1183                       case '4':
     1184                       case '5':
     1185                       case '6':
     1186                       case '7':
     1187                       case '8':
     1188                       case '9':
     1189                           expVal = expVal*10 + ( (int)c - (int)'0' );
     1190                           continue;
     1191                       default:
     1192                           i--;           // back up.
     1193                           break expLoop; // stop parsing exponent.
     1194                       }
     1195                   }
     1196                   int expLimit = bigDecimalExponent+nDigits+nTrailZero;
     1197                   if ( expOverflow || ( expVal > expLimit ) ){
     1198                       //
     1199                       // The intent here is to end up with
     1200                       // infinity or zero, as appropriate.
     1201                       // The reason for yielding such a small decExponent,
     1202                       // rather than something intuitive such as
     1203                       // expSign*Integer.MAX_VALUE, is that this value
     1204                       // is subject to further manipulation in
     1205                       // doubleValue() and floatValue(), and I don't want
     1206                       // it to be able to cause overflow there!
     1207                       // (The only way we can get into trouble here is for
     1208                       // really outrageous nDigits+nTrailZero, such as 2 billion. )
     1209                       //
     1210                       decExp = expSign*expLimit;
     1211                   } else {
     1212                       // this should not overflow, since we tested
     1213                       // for expVal > (MAX+N), where N >= abs(decExp)
     1214                       decExp = decExp + expSign*expVal;
     1215                   }
     1216   
     1217                   // if we saw something not a digit ( or end of string )
     1218                   // after the [Ee][+-], without seeing any digits at all
     1219                   // this is certainly an error. If we saw some digits,
     1220                   // but then some trailing garbage, that might be ok.
     1221                   // so we just fall through in that case.
     1222                   // HUMBUG
     1223                   if ( i == expAt )
     1224                       break parseNumber; // certainly bad
     1225               }
     1226               /*
     1227                * We parsed everything we could.
     1228                * If there are leftovers, then this is not good input!
     1229                */
     1230               if ( i < l &&
     1231                   ((i != l - 1) ||
     1232                   (in.charAt(i) != 'f' &&
     1233                    in.charAt(i) != 'F' &&
     1234                    in.charAt(i) != 'd' &&
     1235                    in.charAt(i) != 'D'))) {
     1236                   break parseNumber; // go throw exception
     1237               }
     1238   
     1239               return new FloatingDecimal( isNegative, decExp, digits, nDigits,  false );
     1240           } catch ( StringIndexOutOfBoundsException e ){ }
     1241           throw new NumberFormatException("For input string: \"" + in + "\"");
     1242       }
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