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Consider the following code:

enum TestEnum
{
   TEST_ENUM_5 = 5
};

class Test
{
public:
   Test() { mType = TEST_ENUM_5; mVal = 1; }
   TestEnum& type() { return (TestEnum&)mType; }

private:
   uint16_t mType;
   uint16_t mVal;
};

int main( int argc, const char* argv[] )
{
   Test test;
   assert( test.type() == TEST_ENUM_5 );
}

The program compiles fine with MSVC 2010 - no errors or warnings. But the assertion fails - the value returned is not 5 but rather 0x00010005.

In other words the value of the returned enumeration is interpreted as a 4 byte value - including the contents of the following short. I can see why the compiler is doing this, the reference is a ref to the address of mType, and a register is being loaded with the next 4 bytes.

But is this correct behavior for the compiler?

Shouldn't it know that TestEnum& is a reference to a 16-bit quantity? Or if it doesn't want to do that, shouldn't it warn?

That aside, what I'd like to do is store a short enumeration into a 16 bit value, and have method that returns a reference to it, that is typed as that typedef. That is logically what I want is an interface that allows me to:

test.type() = TEST_ENUM_5;

And have it know at compile time that only values from TestEnum are expected. For that matter I want users of the class when they read it to know TestEnum values are expected here.

share|improve this question
    
Please copy-paste a complete program for this example. This program fails to compile. Also, is the redundant assignment in Test::Test a typo? –  Robᵩ Oct 26 '12 at 16:19
1  
You never assigned to mType. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 26 '12 at 16:19
    
seth: that was a typo. fixed. –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:21
    
Please don't close the question because of a typo. The problem is real. –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You say that the enum has to be two bytes, and that the return type of type() has to be an enum reference.

C++11 has a feature whereby you can specify the underlying type of an enumeration:

enum TestEnum : unsigned short
{
   TEST_ENUM_5 = 5
};

   TestEnum& type() { return mType; }
private:
   TestEnum mType;
share|improve this answer
    
Not wonderfully happy to introduce dependency on c++11. But your solution does work. –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:35

Well, if you need such usage test.type() = TEST_ENUM_5; just implement it correctly:

   Test() { mType = TEST_ENUM_5; mVal = 1; }
   TestEnum& type() { return mType; }

private:
   TestEnum mType;

upd: "2-bytes" version:

   Test() { mType = TEST_ENUM_5; mVal = 1; }
   uint16_t& type() { return mType; }

private:
   uint16_t mType;
share|improve this answer
    
Or rather it will create a 4 byte enum. I need 2 bytes –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:26
    
Tried that already: error C2440: 'return' : cannot convert from 'uint16_t' to 'TestEnum &' –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:32
    
There is no conversions between uint16_t and TestEnum in my code. –  qehgt Oct 26 '12 at 16:34
    
Err... but then the return type won't be TestEnum. –  Rafael Baptista Oct 26 '12 at 16:35

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