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This question already has an answer here:

How do I verify if a key exists on a NSDictionary?

I know how to verify if it has some content, but I want to very if it is there, because it's dynamic and I have to prevent it. Like in some cases it could happen to have a key with the "name" and is value, but in another cases it could happen that this pair of value don't exists.

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marked as duplicate by Paulw11, AlBlue, user35443, mario, DamienG Jul 8 '15 at 17:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The simplest way is:

[dictionary objectForKey:@"key"] != nil

as dictionaries return nil for non-existant keys (and you cannot therefore store a nil in a dictionary, for that you use NSNull).

Edit: Answer to comment on Bradley's answer

You further ask:

Is there a way to verify if this: [[[contactDetailsDictionary objectForKey:@"professional"] objectForKey:@"CurrentJob"]objectForKey:@"Role"]] exists? Not a single key, because is a really giant dictionary, so it could exist in another category.

In Objective-C you can send a message to nil, it is not an error and returns nil, so expanding the simple method above you just write:

[[[contactDetailsDictionary objectForKey:@"professional"] 
                              objectForKey:@"CurrentJob"] 
                                objectForKey:@"Role"]] != nil

as if any part of the key-sequence doesn't exist the LHS returns nil

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For the chained lookup, you can also use KVC: [contactDetailsDictionary valueForKeyPath:@"professional.CurrentJob.Role"]. – Ken Thomases Dec 20 '14 at 1:42
    
There's a small typo in the 1st line of code, the method name is objectForKey, not objectForkey. – jamix Mar 27 '15 at 7:52
    
@jamix - Thanks, fixed. – CRD Mar 27 '15 at 15:51

NSDictionary returns all of the keys as an NSArray and then use containsObject on the array.

NSDictionary* dictionary = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:@"object", @"key"];
if ([[dictionary allKeys] containsObject:@"key"]) {
  NSLog(@"'key' exists.");
}
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Is there a way to verify if this: [[[contactDetailsDictionary objectForKey:@"professional"] objectForKey:@"CurrentJob"]objectForKey:@"Role"]] exists? Not a single key, because is a really giant dictionary, so it could exist in another category. – fabio santos Oct 26 '12 at 16:40
    
Substitute dictionary with a call to a method returning an NSDictionary. – Bradley M Handy Oct 26 '12 at 16:44
    
If the method returns the same thing, what's the need on doing that? Maybe that's a noob question, but I came from Front End and that Objective C is killing me slowly :P – fabio santos Oct 26 '12 at 16:50
    
I see what you mean. Yeah, you could just assign the value to the dictionary variable and keep the if condition the same. – Bradley M Handy Oct 26 '12 at 16:53
1  
That reply is just awful. It's hard to imagine how you could do this in any more inefficient way. What a waste of memory and CPU time. – gnasher729 Dec 20 '14 at 0:32

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