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need some guide here

I got a code which is

struct Point
{
   int x;
   int y;
};

then at my class i got a function

class MyClass
{
   private:
      Point myPoint[4];
   public:
     void setPoint();
};

void MyClass::setPoint()
{
   int xData,yData;

   for (int i=0;i<4;i++)
   {
      cout << "Please enter x-ordinate:";
      cin >> xData;

      cout << "Please enter y-ordinate:";
      cin >> yData;

      //at this part the code throw a segmentation core dump.
      myPoint[i].x = xData;
      myPoint[i].y = yData;
   }

}

On first run nothing happen, but on 2nd loop, segmentation core dump occur. whats wrong with my code?

Additional code on main.cpp

#include "MyClass.h"

int main()
{
MyClass *mClass;

mclass->setPoint();
}

Thanks for helping.

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closed as too localized by Griwes, ybungalobill, Luchian Grigore, Jon B, Praetorian Oct 26 '12 at 19:47

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What does "run" mean to you? Execute setPoint? Create a MyClass? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 26 '12 at 16:35
    
compile the code and execute, then i run the setPoint function at main class which then i key in the value, and on 2nd prompting of x-ordinate , got thrown a segmentation core dump error. –  user1777711 Oct 26 '12 at 16:38
    
you probably never initialized your structs? –  im so confused Oct 26 '12 at 16:40
    
Don't know if this will fix your problem, but you might want to validate that you were able to convert the user input successfully. do { cout << "Please enter x-ordinate: "; cout.flush(); } while( cin >> xData ); And please post the code where you create an instance of MyClass and call setPoint –  Praetorian Oct 26 '12 at 16:41
2  
The code that you have shown us is not the culprit. If your program is failing, it is because of some other part of your code. Please reduce your original program to the shortest complete program that demonstrates the error and copy-paste that into the question. See sscce.org for more details. –  Robᵩ Oct 26 '12 at 16:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You must allocate memory before use pointer:

int main()
{
    MyClass *mClass = new MyClass ();
    mclass->setPoint();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, it's a good practice to use the destructor when allocating new objects with new. –  EyalAr Oct 26 '12 at 16:50
    
Thanks. thats help to solve ! –  user1777711 Oct 26 '12 at 16:51
3  
Why new? MyClass mClass; mclass.setPoint(); –  Aubin Oct 26 '12 at 17:03
    
I guess he want to use pointer so why not? –  Denis Ermolin Oct 26 '12 at 17:31
MyClass *mClass;

mclass->setPoint();

There's your problem right there. You have never allocated an object, just a pointer.

int main () 
{
  MyClass mclass;
  mclass.setPoint();
}

As an alternative, if you require an object whose lifetime extends beyond the scope of your variable, you could allocate the object with new.

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The problem lies in creating the object. More precisely in your code you have not created a object.Its merely a pointer for which there is memory allocation happened.It should be like this:

MyClass *mClass = new MyClass();
mClass->setPoint();
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you need memory allocation for your object

MyClass *obj = new MyClass();
                ^

new is a language construct that dynamically allocates memory

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related to the construction of an object.

MyClass *mClass;

means you get a Myclass pointer, this pointer has ability to deal with a Myclass-type object, just has ability. but you haven't got an "real object", "real object" means you apply and get a block of memory on the system heap. then

mclass->setPoint();

this call means call the function of a Myclass-type object instead of call the function of a Myclass-class.

So, the code may be correct is:

MyClass *mClass = new MyClass ();
mclass->setPoint();

the new keyword means apply a block of memory for a Myclass-type object.

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