Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In Javascript, the == comparison has a strict (non-type converting) version: ===. Likewise, != has the strict form !==. These protect you from the following craziness:

var s1 = "1",
    i1 = 1,
    i2 = 2;

(s1 == i1)   // true, type conversion
(s1 != i1)   // false, type conversion

(s1 === i1)  // false, no type conversion
(s1 !== i1)  // true, no type conversion

However, the other comparison operators have no equivalent strict modes:

(s1 < i2)   // true, type conversion
(s1 <= i2)  // true, type conversion
([] < i2)   // true, wait ... wat!?

The obvious solution seems pretty verbose:

((typeof s1 === typeof i2) && (s1 < i2))  // false

Is there a more idiomatic (or just less verbose) way to do this in Javascript?

Reference: MDN Comparison Operators

share|improve this question
1  
But don't those operators only make sense if both operands are of the same type? What would you expect for something like [] < 1, or {} >= []? –  bfavaretto Oct 26 '12 at 16:49
    
@bfavaretto But "2" >== 1 should return false –  Juan Mendes Oct 26 '12 at 16:50
    
I think he is saying something more along the lines of "1" < 2. I use strict cases to prevent stupid logic errors in my code, and I assume that is what he is doing as well. –  thatidiotguy Oct 26 '12 at 16:51
    
((s1 === i2) && (s1 < i2)) is not working? –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Oct 26 '12 at 16:52
2  
You might be able to build your own with a preprocessor/macros for JavaScript such as sweet.js –  clentfort Oct 26 '12 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There are no built-in operators for what you want, but you can always create your own functions. For example, for <:

function lt(o1, o2) {
    return ((typeof o1 === typeof o2) && (o1 < o2));
}
lt("10", 11); // false

Another option, if you're only dealing with strings and numbers, is extending String.prototype and Number.prototype:

function lt(o) {
    return ((typeof this.valueOf() === typeof o) && (this < o));
}
String.prototype.lt = lt;
Number.prototype.lt = lt;
"10".lt(11);   // false
(11).lt("12"); // false
share|improve this answer
    
Almost posted the exact same code, but you beat me to it –  Juan Mendes Oct 26 '12 at 17:01
    
new Number(11).lt("12") can be shortened to (11).lt("12") –  Juan Mendes Oct 26 '12 at 17:15
    
Thanks @Juan, changed the example to your version, looks much cleaner. –  bfavaretto Oct 26 '12 at 17:21

How about creating a Object and using it

var strictComparison = {
    "<" : function(a,b) { return ((typeof a === typeof b) && (a < b)) },
    "<=" : function(a,b) { return ((typeof a === typeof b) && (a <= b)) },
    ">" : function(a,b) { return ((typeof a === typeof b) && (a > b)) },
    ">=" : function(a,b) { return ((typeof a === typeof b) && (a >= b)) }
};

console.log(strictComparison["<"](5,"6")) ;  
console.log(strictComparison[">"](5,6)) ;   
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.