Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two files, one with content similar to the following:

1.something344343
2.something2dsdsf
4.somethingdsddfsd
5.something920j329

and the second file would be along the lines of:

1.somethingwoimewoiew
3.something9jwe90jew
7.something90kjwe90ewk

in essence, the first file has more numbered lines then the second one does, the first file goes up to around 39,000 lines, while the second file only goes up to 23,000 lines. Having said that, would anyone know how I could seperate the first file into line numbers (number prefacing the colon) that were included in file 2, and lines that were not included in file 2 (this would be in a bash environment). the end result would be something along the lines of this:

lines included in second file:
1.something344343

lines not included in second file:
2.something2dsdsf
4.somethingdsddfsd
5.something920j329

I've thought over different methods that I could use to do this, but unfortunately have not been able to come up with any effective solutions yet, if anyone could help out with this though I would really appreciate it, thanks!

share|improve this question
    
So you are only concerned with the #s that each line starts with, not whatever comes after? (i.e. If file 1 has 1.Apples; 2.Bananas and file 2 has 1.Oranges; 3.Berries, you want file 1 to be split into 1.Apples and 2.Bananas? – sampson-chen Oct 26 '12 at 16:57
    
@sampson-chen yep exactly, i've been processing the contents of file one, and the results are the contents of file 2, so I am trying to find a way separate what i have processed so far, and what I have not processed yet. – lacrosse1991 Oct 26 '12 at 17:00
up vote 5 down vote accepted

lines included in second file:

$ join -t"." -o 0,1.2 f1 f2
1.something344343

lines not included in second file:

$ join -t"." -v1 f1 f2
2.something2dsdsf
4.somethingdsddfsd
5.something920j329
share|improve this answer
    
worked perfectly :) thanks! – lacrosse1991 Oct 27 '12 at 2:24

Only shows line numbers, not line contents:

$ diff --unchanged-group-format=$'Lines included in second file:\n%=' \
       --old-group-format=$'Lines not included in second file:\n%<' \
       --new-group-format='' \
       <(awk -F. '{print $1}' file1) <(awk -F. '{print $1}' file2)
Lines included in second file:
1
Lines not included in second file:
2
4
5
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.