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I'm having some trouble in designing proper classes which will use own memory allocation. Consider this:

class IAbstract { ... };
class CConcrete : public IAbstract { ... };

I want to do something like this:

IAbstract *ptr = new CConcrete();
delete ptr;

The problem is, I want "new" of CConcrete to use memory allocator. Also, I want "delete" to use propriate deallocator. However, new and delete are static functions, so delete in an above example won't call delete of CConcrete (as it should do if delete would be virtual).

One way to solve this is to make something like this:

class IAbstract {
public:
   virtual Delete(void* ptr)=0;
   void operator delete(void* ptr) {

      ((IAbstract*)(ptr))->Delete(ptr);
   }
}; 

and overriding Delete in derived classes. But this solution is pretty ugly, especially casting ptr to IAbstract*.

Is there any better way to do it?

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What do you mean with "own memory allocation"? Do you want CConcrete to have access over how they are placed in memory? Or do you just want them to allocate their own member variables? –  Jasper Oct 26 '12 at 16:57
    
I want CConcrete to be allocated with my own function, not standard malloc. –  aod Oct 26 '12 at 16:59
    
Please create the shortest possible complete program that demonstrates the problem you are having, and copy-paste that program into your question. see sscce.org for more information. –  Robᵩ Oct 26 '12 at 17:04

3 Answers 3

Have you tried this? Placement new/delete

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It is diffictult to know precisely what is wrong with your code since you have elided so much of it. The best I can do is to show you a working program.

Consider this program:

#include <iostream>
#define X() (std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << "\n")

class IAbstract {
public:
  virtual ~IAbstract() { X(); }
};
class CConcrete : public IAbstract {
public:
  void* operator new(size_t sz) {
    X();
    return ::operator new(sz); // or however you allocate memory
  }
  void operator delete(void* p) {
    X();
    ::operator delete(p); // or however you de-allocate memory
  }
  ~CConcrete() { X(); }
};

int main () {
  IAbstract *ptr = new CConcrete();
  delete ptr;
}

The output on my computer is this:

static void* CConcrete::operator new(size_t)
virtual CConcrete::~CConcrete()
virtual IAbstract::~IAbstract()
static void CConcrete::operator delete(void*)

Notice that when delete ptr is executed, delete correctly calls the virtual destructor and the correct operator delete().

Note: this requires g++ due to the use of __PRETTY_FUNCTION__

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The first funny thing is that you cannot cast your void pointer to call any member function. Technically it compiles, but operator delete is called after the object (or object hierarchy) is destroyed (by calling destructor(s)). In other words — what you are doing is UB since you are trying to access vtable of a destroyed class.

Another thing is that as long as your destructor is virtual, a proper delete operator is invoked on a class. So there is no need to re-invent your own mechanism using extra vtable resources on top of it. I think the following approach is what you are looking for:

#include <new>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>

class Base {
  public:
    Base() { }
    virtual ~Base() { printf("Base::~Base()\n"); }
};

class Derived : public Base {
    char data[256];

  public:
    Derived() {}
    virtual ~Derived() { printf("Derived::~Derived()\n"); }

    void *operator new(size_t size)
    {
        void *p = malloc(size);
        printf("Allocated %lu bytes @ %p\n", size, p);
        return p;
    }

    void operator delete(void *ptr)
    {
        printf("Freeing %p\n", ptr);
        free(ptr);
    }
};

int main()
{
    Base *b = new Base();
    delete b;
    b = new Derived();
    delete b;
}

But don't forget that as soon as you remove a virtual destructor, your overloaded operator delete won't be called.

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