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I have an array of function instances, and several arrays of arguments to apply to those instances. The array of function instances can be of arbitrary size. The definitions are as follows (yes, each function takes the same arguments):

fcn1(a, b, c)
fcn2(a, b, c)

Each function argument is an array of floats, for example:

a = numpy.array([1., 2., 3.])
b = numpy.array([1., 2., 3.])
c = numpy.array([1., 2., 3.])

The array of function instances looks like the following:

[<function fcn1 at 0x030A44F0> <function fcn2 at 0x030A4530>]

What I'm trying to is map the function arguments to each of the array instances.

So far I tried something simple like:

for f in fcn:
    print f(a, b, c)

But the way the functions are constructed, they return X number of arrays where X is the number of elements in each of a, b, and c. For example, if I simply call:

fcn1(a, b, c)

It will return (note three elements in each of the input args, three arrays returned):

[array([0.2343, 0.4943, ..., 0.8943, 0.7115]), array([0.2343, 0.4853, ..., 0.8555, 0.1915]), array([0.7773, 0.1343, ..., 0.8045, 0.9994])]

So what happens when I run my simple loop is two arrays of arrays:

[array([0.2343, 0.4943, ..., 0.8943, 0.7115]), array([0.2343, 0.4853, ..., 0.8555, 0.1915]), array([0.7773, 0.1343, ..., 0.8045, 0.9994])]
[array([0.2343, 0.4943, ..., 0.8943, 0.7115]), array([0.2343, 0.4853, ..., 0.8555, 0.1915]), array([0.7773, 0.1343, ..., 0.8045, 0.9994])]

Any thoughts on how to elegantly apply the arguments to the function instances?

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1  
What's wrong with what you're getting out of your loop? –  Marcin Oct 26 '12 at 17:07
    
It's duplicating the results because each function returns X number of arrays where X is the number of elements in each of the input arguments. –  strimp099 Oct 26 '12 at 17:26
    
Please integrate this information into your question. It's also unclear how that duplication occurs, so if you can relate it to the example input and output, that will help understanding of your question significantly. –  Marcin Oct 26 '12 at 17:34
    
I noted the duplication above the last code block. –  strimp099 Oct 26 '12 at 17:42
    
Wait, if the problem is that every iteration returns the same result, why not just apply only the first function in the list? –  Marcin Oct 26 '12 at 18:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if I'm understanding you correctly, but did you just want:

for f in fcn:
    for ix in range(len(a)):
      print f(a[ix], b[ix], c[ix])
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Yes that is the idea, but I would like to avoid looping through the elements in a, b, and c. The functions were all re-written to take advantage of vectorization. –  strimp099 Oct 26 '12 at 17:25
    
@strimp099 So, the issue is that you want to apply the functions to columns, not rows? –  Marcin Oct 26 '12 at 18:12
    
I used your advice to loop through the elements in the input arrays. I had to modify the functions to accept floats as opposed to arrays. –  strimp099 Oct 26 '12 at 18:34

If I'm reading this right, you want to end up with a data structure containing a list of lists of your function results.

function_result_set = [func(*argument_list) for func in function_list]

This will work for any arbitrary length sequence of functions (or in fact callables, such as classes) as long as each function is able to work with len(argument_list) arguments.

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