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JavaScript function with ‘undefined’ parameter

I'm looking the jQuery Color source code here

http://code.jquery.com/color/jquery.color-2.1.0.js

And I found that the closure function take an undefined value as it's second parameter. See below:

(function( jQuery, undefined ) {

    var stepHooks = "backgroundColor borderBottomColor borderLeftColor borderRightColor borderTopColor color columnRuleColor outlineColor textDecorationColor textEmphasisColor",

    // plusequals test for += 100 -= 100
    rplusequals = /^([\-+])=\s*(\d+\.?\d*)/,
    // a set of RE's that can match strings and generate color tuples.

Or you can see it in the source code. Look at the second parameter.

The point I want to know is that why the second parameter is undefined?

I think it is an approach to strictly set the function to receive only one parameter.

I'm I right? Or anyone can help me out?

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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, Frédéric Hamidi, Jason Berkan, ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ, Graviton Nov 1 '12 at 4:38

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1 Answer 1

That's in case some other part of the code assigns some value to the undefined name. The closure is actually called with only one argument, as:

(function(jQuery, undefined) {
    // ...
})(jQuery);

That ensures that undefined is actually bound to undefined within the closure.

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4  
Because, for some unfathomable reason, undefined is not a keyword. –  Niet the Dark Absol Oct 26 '12 at 17:36
    
still dont get it.. so is it just related to naming convention? any example?? –  Amitd Oct 26 '12 at 17:39
1  
@Amitd, let's consider that a (possibly malicious) script in the page assigns "foo" to undefined. Without this workaround, comparisons to undefined would not work properly (they would become comparisons to "foo") and the resulting behavior would be quite hard to understand and diagnose. –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 26 '12 at 17:41
    
That is, "undefined" is't a keyword and can assign a value to it? Let me try it... –  Xieranmaya Oct 26 '12 at 17:47
1  
@Xieranmaya, you must be using a recent browser that conforms to version 5 of the ECMA specs. Not all browsers do that. –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 26 '12 at 18:04

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