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This is my first kernel and in my sample program below, I have created a simple proc/filesystem. I see READ is called 3 times whenever I cat the kernel. Wondering why it is doing this.

Out and the code is below.

cat /proc/myKernel
dmesg | grep -i myKernel
myKernel: Read (/proc/myKernel) called
myKernel: Read (/proc/myKernel) called
myKernel: Read (/proc/myKernel) called

int myKernel_read( char *buffer, char **bufferLocation, off_t offset, int bufferLength, int *eof, void *data )
{
    int ret = 0;
    u64 msrvalue;

    printk(KERN_INFO "myKernel: Read (/proc/%s) called\n", procFile_name);
    ret = sprintf(buffer, "Hello World\n");

    return ret;
}

static int __init myKernel_init(void)
{
    entry = create_proc_entry(procFile_name, 0644, NULL);
    if(!entry)
        printk(KERN_INFO "myKernel: error registering proc control file\n");
    else 
    {
        entry->read_proc = myKernel_read;
    }

    return 0;
}
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closed as not constructive by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, bensiu, the Tin Man, Nik...., arrowdodger Oct 27 '12 at 7:06

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Have you tried reading the cat source code? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 26 '12 at 20:24
1  
Well, you are returning garbage (uninitialized ret variable) from your myKernel_read function, which means you have no idea what it's returning. I suspect you are also not filling in some of the output parameters you're supposed to fill in (like *eof). Try fixing that and seeing what happens. If it still happens, try logging the important parameters to myKernel_read like offset in order to give yourself a better idea what's going on. Finally, what do mean by "This is my first kernel"? –  Celada Oct 26 '12 at 20:30
    
my bad. While coping selected text, I didn't include the buffer filling code line. I still see three debug messages (dnesg | grep myKernel) –  cheers00 Oct 26 '12 at 20:33
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1 Answer

Problem is with ret value. I still do not know why this is called thrice but I have to do the actual reading when offset is less than zero.

int myKernel_read( char *buffer, char **bufferLocation, off_t offset, int bufferLength, int *eof, void *data )
{
    int ret;
    u64 msrvalue;

    if (offset > 0) 
    {
        /* we have finished to read, return 0 */
        ret  = 0;
    } else 
    {
        /* fill the buffer, return the buffer size */
                // DO THE READ HERE. NOT OUTSIDE
                //
                printk(KERN_INFO "myKernel: Read (/proc/%s) called\n", procFile_name);
        ret = sprintf(buffer, "MyKernel = %x\n", 0);
    }

    return ret;
}
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