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Yesterday I took a part in interview for PHP developer postion. My job was to solve 15 questions in quite simple test. One of the questions was to mark all places, in given example PHP code, where execution would be stopped with fatal error. Among others, I marked as wrong something like that:

$this->someFunction(#);

The other person on interview told me, that I was wrong, because this is not a fatal error.

Can someone enlight me, why and how do we use hashes (#) in PHP function calls? I have never seen a construction like that and Google told me less than nothing on this (or maybe I did incorrect search).

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closed as not constructive by nickb, tereško, John Conde, Jocelyn, ЯegDwight Oct 26 '12 at 23:52

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Was that line on its own or did another line follow? – delnan Oct 26 '12 at 20:09
1  
In PHP, # is used for comments. php.net/manual/en/language.basic-syntax.comments.php – Rocket Hazmat Oct 26 '12 at 20:11
    
@delnan: That line was among others, but the example, where you should find errors was iself a bunch of correct-incorrect pieces of PHP, not related, not corresponding to each other and unable to be executed as one piece. It was rather a garbage or collection. – trejder Oct 26 '12 at 20:11
    
@RocketHazmat: Which means, that it can't be used in function call, and which leads to a conlusion, that I was right -- this is an error, right? – trejder Oct 26 '12 at 20:12
3  
@trejder it is an error, just not a fatal error. It's a "parse error" – sachleen Oct 26 '12 at 20:13
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The # character is used for single-line comments.

It would be a syntax error on its own because there would be no )

$this->someFunction(#);

This is read as:

$this->someFunction(

But, if there are lines after this, then it's ok. Example:

$this->someFunction(#);
    'a', 'b', 'c'
);

The #); is a comment, and not parsed, so PHP sees

$this->someFunction(
    'a', 'b', 'c'
);

Which is valid.

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1  
The example is technically valid, but HORRIBLE practice. – SomeKittens Oct 26 '12 at 20:15
2  
It's not practice, it's a test. – dev-null-dweller Oct 26 '12 at 20:17
1  
I agree. As I wrote in a comment to my question, the whole example was a bunch of horrible written PHP code. – trejder Oct 26 '12 at 20:20

This will cause a 'parse error', not fatal. just simply check it yourself.

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But the interviewers said exactly: this is not an error at all. – trejder Oct 26 '12 at 20:13
1  
damn beat me to it. – ars265 Oct 26 '12 at 20:13
2  
@trejder, Was the line below it something like );? – Brad Oct 26 '12 at 20:13
    
@trejder than you're not telling the complete truth :D. if there was code after the given line, it will make difference. – Headshota Oct 26 '12 at 20:15
    
To be honest, I don't remember right now, what was below. But, as I see from Rocket Hazmat answer, I was wrong after all. In some certain condition, this could work. – trejder Oct 26 '12 at 20:16

PHP code typically uses C-style comments (// and /* */). However, PHP does use shell style comments (i.e. #). Thus, #I think PHP is ignoring all my comments is a valid comment.

In the above code, you'd get a fatal syntax error, because PHP is only seeing $this->someFunction( (No closing paren or semicolon).

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