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I am using underscores to represent the length of a unknown word. How can I print just the underscores without the brackets that represent the list?

Basically, if I have a list of the form ['_', '_', '_', '_'], I want to print the underscores without printing them in list syntax as "_ _ _ _"

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up vote 15 down vote accepted

Does this work for you

>>> my_dashes = ['_', '_', '_', '_']
>>> print ''.join(my_dashes)
____
>>> print ' '.join(my_dashes)
_ _ _ _
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3  
+1 beat me to it. – Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 26 '12 at 21:52
2  
@AshwiniChaudhary: been trolling for new questions so I could hit the +200 daily rep today :P – inspectorG4dget Oct 26 '12 at 21:53
    
And you just crossed 200. :) – Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 26 '12 at 21:55
    
thank you very much. – user1718826 Oct 26 '12 at 21:55
    
@user1718826: please accept if it was the correct answer – inspectorG4dget Oct 26 '12 at 21:56
In [1]: my_dashes = ['_', '_', '_', '_']

In [2]: str(my_dashes).translate(None, '[],\'')
Out[2]: '_ _ _ _'

Add an extra space in the deletechars string to put the dashes together.

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The previously-mentioned join solution (like in following line) is a reasonable solution:

print ''.join(['_', '_', '_', '_'])
____

But also note you can use reduce() to do the job:

print reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, ['_', '_', '_', '_'])
____

After import operator you can say:

print reduce(operator.add, ['_', '_', '_', '_'])
____
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