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I'm writing a shortcut JavaScript file to make $date and $time variables. It should work as far as I can tell, but it won't display and Google Chrome's debugger shows a [Uncaught TypeError: Cannot Read 'firstChild' of null]

Here's my code:

function mdy(){

    var
        h = new Date(),
        year = h.getFullYear(),
        month = h.getMonth() + 1,
        day = h.getDate();

        if(month < 10) { month = "0" + month; }

        if(day < 10) { month = "0" + month; }

        var string = month + "/" + day + "/" + year;

        document.getElementById('mdy').firstChild.nodeValue = string;

}

function ymd(){

    var
        h = new Date(),
        year = h.getFullYear(),
        month = h.getMonth() + 1,
        day = h.getDate();

        if(month < 10) { month = "0" + month; }

        if(day < 10) { month = "0" + month; }

        var string = year + "/" + month + "/" + day;

        document.getElementById('ymd').firstChild.nodeValue = string;

}

var $date = {

    mdy: '<span id="mdy">&nbsp;</span>',
    ymd: '<span id="ymd">&nbsp;</span>'

}

/* $time module */
// this comes in two formats, standard and military. 
// type $time.standard for standard time and $time.military
// for military time
function tstandard(){

    var
        h = new Date(),
        hours = h.getHours(),
        minutes = h.getMinutes();

        minutes = ( minutes < 10 ? "0" : "" ) + minutes;

        var diem = ( hours < 12 ) ? "am" : "pm";

        hours = ( hours > 12 ) ? hours - 12 : hours;

        hours = ( hours == 0 ) ? 12 : hours;

        var string = hours + ":" + minutes + " " + diem;

        document.getElementById("tstandard").firstChild.nodeValue = string;

}

function tmilitary() {

    var
        h = new Date(),
        hours = h.getHours(),
        minutes = h.getMinutes();

        minutes = ( minutes < 10 ? "0" : "" ) + minutes;

        hours = ( hours == 0 ) ? 12 : hours;

        if(hours < 10) { hours = "0" + hours }

        var string = hours + ":" + minutes;

        document.getElementById("tmilitary").firstChild.nodeValue = string;

}

var $time = {

    standard: "<span id='tstandard'>&nbsp;</span>",
    military: "<span id='tmilitary'>&nbsp;</span>"

}

/*! universal body onload function !*/
window.onload = function(){

    mdy(); setInterval('mdy()', 1000);
            ymd(); setInterval('ymd()', 1000);

    tstandard(); setInterval('tstandard()', 1000);
    tmilitary(); setInterval('tmilitary()', 1000);

} 

And in my HTML, I'm doing:

<script>document.write($date.mdy + " - " + $time.standard);</script> 
share|improve this question
    
OT: Provide the setInterval (and setTimeout) function with references to the functions you want to call instead of strings that need to be parsed and evaluated. (It leads to unnecessary memory overhead and uglier code.) setInterval(mdy, 1000) –  Jan Kuča Oct 26 '12 at 22:27
    
Umm. Yeah I did, that, now the error console is refreshing every second and the error count is going up every 1000 (the time I set in setInterval). So, apparently, I have 24 errors and counting... –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:32
    
Makes sense. You are calling both ymd and mdy while only creating a placeholder element for one of those (the same for the time). Comment out the ymd() and tmilitary() lines to see if it helps. –  Jan Kuča Oct 26 '12 at 22:37
    
No, it didn't help. :( It's weird cause I did this on a separate computer and it worked perfectly, then I moved the files to another computer and now it's not working. –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are adding two placeholder elements to the DOM – <span id="ymd"></span> and <span id="tstandard">.

Then, in the window.onload handler, you are trying to update contents of not only these two placeholders but also of two other elements which are not in the DOM (id="ymd" and id="tmilitary"). The document.getElementById('ymd') (and 'tmilitary') call correctly returns undefined because of that fact.

You want to remove the calls to the ymd and tmilitary functions.

window.onload = function(){
  mdy();
  setInterval(mdy, 1000);

  tstandard();
  setInterval(tstandard, 1000);
};

I also changed the calls to setInterval to simplify things. Passing references is more efficient and clear.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I fixed it thanks to this! –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:52
    
You're welcome. I hope you actually get what is the problem, not only copying the code. –  Jan Kuča Oct 26 '12 at 22:54
    
Yeah, I think I do. Usually with stuff like this I wont get it until hours after hours just staring at it. Lol. –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:56
    
Don't worry; it'll come with time and experience. –  Jan Kuča Oct 26 '12 at 22:59

I think you might want this:

document.getElementById('mdy').innerHTML = string;

or this:

document.getElementById('mdy').nodeValue = string;

instead of this:

document.getElementById('mdy').firstChild.nodeValue = string;

That should take care of the errors. (There's no need to get the firstChild from a getElementById call, it already returns a node by default.)

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm.. It's still showing the same error. :/ –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:21
    
Did you replace all the occurrences of the third line of code I posted? There were at least two in the code you showed us. –  Elliot Bonneville Oct 26 '12 at 22:21
    
Yes, I did. I used the "Find and Replace" feature in my code editor then double checked it. I tried both .innerHTML and .nodeValue and still is showing the error. Could it be because of the placement of my code? Because I have some other stuff going on before the code I showed you but it has nothing to do with the features I'm currently working on. –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:25
    
You can't use the "Find and Replace" feature for that whole line--try something like searching for each occurrence of "firstChild" instead. –  Elliot Bonneville Oct 26 '12 at 22:26
    
Okay, I did so. I had two other firstChild occurrences somewhere else on my core.js file but it didn't have anything to do with the date and time. (Which, by the way, I did delete the firstChild occurrences, but it's showing the same exact error in the same place). –  ModernDesigner Oct 26 '12 at 22:29

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