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On GitHub's Twitter bootstrap pages the Base CSS page's section on icons says this:

Glyphicons Halflings are normally not available for free, but an arrangement between Bootstrap and the Glyphicons creators have made this possible at no cost to you as developers. As a thank you, we ask you to include an optional link back to Glyphicons whenever practical.

Is there a standard form this attribution should take?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

To answer my own question, the solution is presumably to attribute Glyphicons in the same way that Twitter do in the footer of the bootstrap GitHub pages, namely:

<p>Icons from <a href="http://glyphicons.com">Glyphicons Free</a>, licensed 
under <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">CC BY 3.0</a>.</p>

This does seem to gloss over the fact that the halflings are specifically not covered by the Creative Commons licence, but I guess if it's good enough for Twitter then it should be okay for the rest of us.

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Glyphicons Halflings are also a part of Bootstrap by Twitter, and are released under the same Apache 2.0 license as Bootstrap. While you are not required to include attribution on your Bootstrap-based projects, I’d certainly appreciate a visibile link back to glyphicons.com in any place you find appropriate (footer, docs, etc).

This's from http://glyphicons.com/glyphicons-licenses/. I hope this help you.

For me, I will make credit page and put link back to glyphicons. I don't want to put link at footer because this's under Apache 2.0 license not CC. I really appreciate their work but putting link at footer is about SEO too.

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