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In the following code, i have an overloaded method, one that takes a parameter of type ClazzA and the other of type ClazzB. In the code shown, the first GetDescription method (the one that takes ClazzA as a parameter) is called. I think i understand why.
My question is..is there an elegant way of having the method that takes clazzB called first if the underlying object is of type classB (without having to inspect each object and casting it to clazzB)?

public class ClazzA
{
    public virtual string Descr { get { return "A"; } }
}

public class ClazzB : ClazzA
{
    public override string Descr { get { return "B"; } }
}

public static class test
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        ClazzA test = new ClazzB();
        GetDecription(test);
    }

    public static void GetDecription(ClazzA someClazz)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("I am here");
    }

    public static void GetDecription(ClazzB someClazz)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("I want to be here");
    }
}

Output: "I am here"

I really want the 2nd method to be called since 'test' is of type ClassB. Curerently the only two solutions i have is:

  1. if (test is ClazzB) return GetDescription( (ClazzB) test );

or

  1. In ClassA do pretty much the same thing...check the type and delegate to the 2nd method

Both of these require inspection of the object to determine its type

share|improve this question
3  
I don't believe you're getting "A". –  roken Oct 26 '12 at 23:05
    
srry..u r right, i'm not getting a, but it's entering the GetDescription method with ClazzA as a parameter when i would like it to enter the 2n method. i'll modify to remove the output –  mike01010 Oct 26 '12 at 23:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Overloads are determined at compile time. The compile time type of the reference is ClazzA so that overload is chosen. What you are asking for is related to multiple dispatch. C# and many other languages like C++ and Java only support single dispatch (via virtual methods). There are a number of ways people have come up with to work around this. The purest OO way of doing this is the visitor pattern. You modify the classes to contain a method (Accept) which then passes the this reference to a method on the visitor (Visit). This works because you override the Accept method in each subclass so that this will be the object's actual type. All the visitor needs is a specific method for each subclass that you want to support (see wikipedia for more details).

A sample:

public class ClazzA
{
   public virtual string Accept(ClassVisitor visitor)
   {
      return visitor.Visit(this);
   }
}

public class ClazzB : ClazzA
{
   public override string Accept(ClassVisitor visitor)
   {
      return visitor.Visit(this);
   }
}

public abstract class ClassVisitor
{
  public abstract string Visit(ClazzA a);
  public abstract string Visit(ClazzB b);
}

public class GetDescriptionVisitor : ClassVisitor
{
    public override string Visit(ClazzA a)
    {
       return "A";
    }

    public override string Visit(ClazzB b)
    {
       return "B";
    }
}

Usage:

ClassVisitor visitor = new GetDescriptionVisitor();
ClazzA b = new ClazzB();
Console.WriteLine(b.Accept(visitor)); // prints "B"
share|improve this answer
    
Since .NET 4, dynamic dispatch is possible in C# using the dynamic keyword: GetDescription((dynamic)test);: Prints "I want to be here" –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 9 '13 at 14:43

What you're trying to do is probably better performed using polymorphism, like so:

public interface IProvideDescription { 
  string GetDescription();
}

public class A : IProvideDescription {
  public string GetDescription() {
    return "I'm an A";
  }
}

public class B : IProvideDescription {
  public string GetDescription() {
    return "I'm a B";
  }
}

// to execute:

IProvideDescription x = new A();
Console.WriteLine(x.GetDescription());
x = new B();
Console.WriteLine(x.GetDescription());
share|improve this answer
    
I think my problem might be slightly different...what if the method that is being called only knows how to operate on a particular type of an object. for example one GetDescription method knows how to provide a calculated description of ClazzA and other knows how to do so for ClazzB. My question is..how can i make such that the subclassed type takes precedence when determining which method is invoked. –  mike01010 Oct 26 '12 at 23:34
    
If you still insist on your current path you can easily get the second behaviour with a simple cast. Change GetDecription(test); to GetDecription((ClazzB)test);. –  Tahbaza Oct 27 '12 at 1:31
    
yes i know...as i indicated in my question. was just seeing if anyone knows of a way of avoiding that as it does require inspection –  mike01010 Oct 28 '12 at 5:41

To answer the question in your title ("...why is the base class given precedence?"), look at what your variable test is declared as (answer: your base class). When the overload is selected, all the method call knows is that you're passing a variable of type ClazzA into it. Sure, you've assigned it an object of type ClazzB, but suppose your assignment statement was more complex:

ClazzA test = GiveMeSomeObject();

The method selection has to occur at compile time to provide type safety.

share|improve this answer
    
Official explination: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691336(v=VS.71).aspx –  roken Oct 26 '12 at 23:21
    
yes..its not an easy question to headline. i have a use case where i wished at runtime things were different...where if a variable is assigned to a object that is a subclass, then the method with a parameter matching that subclass would be invoked first if one exists. –  mike01010 Oct 26 '12 at 23:50

Because the method overload resolution occurs at compile-time. In terms of dealing with this situation, if you are using C# 4 then you could use dynamic so that the overload resolution is deferred to execution-time.

dynamic instance = new ClazzB();
Console.WriteLine(GetDescription(instance));

Alternatively, you could use a Visitor Pattern something like the following but this double-dispatch approach feels like a lot of work. Note the repetitive Visit method that must be re-implement in every derived type!

public interface IVisitable
{
    string Visit(DescriptionVisitor visitor);
}

public class ClazzA : IVisitable
{
    public virtual string Visit(DescriptionVisitor visitor)
    {
        return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}

public class ClazzB : ClazzA
{
    public override string Visit(DescriptionVisitor visitor)
    {
        return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
}

public class DescriptionVisitor
{
    public string Visit(ClazzA item) { return "Description A"; }
    public string Visit(ClazzB item) { return "Description B"; }
}

Then the following will ultimately still call the overload in DescriptionVisitor that takes ClazzB.

var visitor = new DescriptionVisitor();
ClazzA a = new ClazzB();
Console.WriteLine(a.Visit(visitor));
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Generally it's not a responsibility of external class to identify class type. if you need a polymorphic behavior, just put GetDescription into ClassA as virtual function and then override in ClassB - that will be conceptually correct.

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As @roken mentioned, your example will actually result in B since the Descr property is overridden. If this is all you're doing, remove the ClazzB overload and use the polymorphic behavior you've already got. If you actually need to do something different in the methods and overloading is the best way to do that, you could do it via dynamic overload resolution:

GetDecription((dynamic)test);

However, this has some drawbacks, such as performance and a lack of compile-time testing that GetDescription(test) makes sense. I'd recommend doing a runtime check within GetDecription(ClazzA):

if (someClazz is ClazzB)
{
    GetDescription((ClazzB)someClazz);
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, i've updated my question to remove the output. what i want is to invoke GetDescription(clazzB) without having to check the typeof b. the real use-case for this is for example..clazzb has some additional properties and to get a 'calculated' description, i need to pass those additional properties to a stored procs. Currently i am doing exactly as you have suggested...i was hoping to avoid that if possible. i was thinking perhaps generics –  mike01010 Oct 26 '12 at 23:24
    
It sounds like using polymorphism would better suit your needs. See Tahbaza's solution. –  Tim S. Oct 26 '12 at 23:28

You can get the behaviour you want by using the "dynamic" keyword which was introduced in .Net 4.0. It evaluates the type at runtime and will pick the right overload.

public static class test
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        dynamic test = new ClazzB();
        GetDecription(test);
    }

    public static void GetDecription(ClazzA someClazz)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("I am here");
    }

    public static void GetDecription(ClazzB someClazz)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("I want to be here");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it's just a workaround, which will generally reduce performance –  vyakhir Oct 27 '12 at 7:28

You can get by with just a single GetDescription() method:

public String GetDescription(ClassA in) {
    if (in is ClassB) {
        return (in as ClassB).Descr 
    }

    return in.Descr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ignoring the premise of the question, this is not a practical implementation. What if you have 20 classes in your inheritence hierarchy? The whole point of inheritence and overriding methods is to avoid code like this. –  roken Oct 26 '12 at 23:06
    
@roken: Could you elaborate –  xbonez Oct 26 '12 at 23:07
    
@xbonex (updated comment above) Also, both returns will return "B" –  roken Oct 26 '12 at 23:08

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