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I'm working on some jQuery to resize images on a page. This block works fine:

var size = 350;
$("img").each(function () {
    if ($(this).height() > $(this).width()) {
        var h = size;
        var w = Math.ceil(($(this).width() / $(this).height()) * size);
    }
    else {
        var w = size;
        var h = Math.ceil(($(this).height() / $(this).width()) * size);
    }
    $(this).css({ "height": h, "width": w });
});

The problem is small images are scaled up. No problem, one more if statement should take care of that!

var size = 350;
$("img").each(function () {
    if ($(this).height() > size || $(this).width() > size) { //Always false
        if ($(this).height() > $(this).width()) {
            var h = size;
            var w = Math.ceil(($(this).width() / $(this).height()) * size);
        }
        else {
            var w = size;
            var h = Math.ceil(($(this).height() / $(this).width()) * size);
        }
        $(this).css({ "height": h, "width": w });
    }
});

Where am I going wrong here?

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What are the sizes (height/width) of your images? –  0x499602D2 Oct 27 '12 at 0:45
1  
Did you try to alert() the values? Maybe they are null? –  Konrad Viltersten Oct 27 '12 at 0:46
    
The images come in all sorts of sizes. The source is a crawl of stared messages in chat.stackoverflow.com; so whatever people post. –  Billdr Oct 27 '12 at 0:53
2  
If the images are still loading, their dimensions will be 0. Are you running this immediately when the DOM is ready? –  I Hate Lazy Oct 27 '12 at 0:55
1  
Quote: Caveats of the load event when used with images: Can cease to fire for images that already live in the browser's cache (api.jquery.com/load-event). You'd better use both each and load (if you don't mind running the code twice). –  Pang Oct 27 '12 at 1:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem might be that you think you're getting values from a component, while you're in fact getting value (or not getting any values other than null) from somewhere else.

A quick and dirty approach is to:

alert(thatDarnedValue);

or, if you know how, write it out to the console window, development DIV or whatever you use to debug and actually see what's in there.

I often get surprised - "this is not supposed to be there"-experience.

This kind of pitfall is often the case when we're checking for values of graphical components at different stages of readiness. A document might be loaded but not ready etc.

share|improve this answer
    
@Billdr Why the down vote?! I thought you were helped by my suggestion... Do I miss something? –  Konrad Viltersten Oct 27 '12 at 19:08
    
That wasn't from me. I'll get you back to 0. –  Billdr Oct 28 '12 at 14:21

The problem was my script was firing before the images on my page loaded, even though the script tag was at the bottom of the page. Lesson learned there! I changed the .each to a .load, which is fine for my purposes.

A better solution might be to wrap this in the $("window").load() event or $(document).ready().

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