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here is my javascript code:

var my_array = new Array();
my_array[0] = "a";
my_array[0] = "b";
my_array[0] = "c";

print_array(my_array);

function print_array(arr)
{
   alert(arr);
}

But it doesn't work, because I can't pass the array to the function. So, how can I pass an entire array to javascript function?

EDIT: Nevermind. I found the solution.
Hidden cause this is bad practice and passes the array as a string:

If someone will need to pass an array to the function, first use this: JSON.stringify() and javascript will be able to parse an array.

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6 Answers 6

Try this code instead:

function print_array(arr)
{
   alert(arr);
}

var my_array = new Array();
my_array[0] = "a";
my_array[1] = "b";
my_array[2] = "c";

print_array(my_array);

You should define a function before you can call it as a good programming practice.

Also note the order of your elements that are being assigned, you're putting everything on 0, and they should be on 1, 2 etc.

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Not in JS you don't. Functions are hoisted. –  0x499602D2 Oct 27 '12 at 1:15
    
Good point David, hoisting. Forgot that. Updated to make it about a good business practice. –  jcolebrand Oct 27 '12 at 1:17
    
you only have to define the function before you call it, when it is assigned to a variable like so: var myFunc = function(){ alert(123) } –  Billy Moon Oct 27 '12 at 1:17

The problem is you are assigning each element to index 0, so they are overwriting each other.

// should be
my_array[0] = "a";
my_array[1] = "b";
my_array[2] = "c";

// alternatively, if you don't want to track the index
my_array.push("a");
my_array.push("b");
my_array.push("c");

The rest of the code looks fine. You can pass whole arrays, or any object for that matter to a function in exactly the manner you have shown in your code.

When you alert it, javascript will concatenate the array into a comma separated string for easy viewing.

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or my_array.push("a", "b", "c") –  roberkules Oct 27 '12 at 1:19
    
Or var my_array = ["a", "b", "c"]; as in another answer... –  Billy Moon Oct 27 '12 at 1:21
    
not sure why this was downvoted - looks ok to me –  Billy Moon Oct 27 '12 at 1:22
1  
Or 'abc'.split('') :) –  roberkules Oct 27 '12 at 1:22
    
@roberkules: I like that one, I think you deserve a prize for that. –  Billy Moon Oct 27 '12 at 1:23
  • You called the function before it's defined. Define it first before use. Although JS has "hoisting", but it's good practice to code this way. Avoids validator (like JSLint) errors,
  • Use console.log to view objects instead of using alert
  • Also, it's better to use literal notation:

All in all, here's a more simplified code:

var myArray = ['a','b','c'];

function print_array(arr){
    console.log(arr);
}

print_array(myArray);
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Your first point is not valid as the function works –  codingbiz Oct 27 '12 at 1:18
    
@codingbiz but it's good practice to do so, and avoids JSLint warnings. –  Joseph the Dreamer Oct 27 '12 at 1:19
    
I agree with you too –  codingbiz Oct 27 '12 at 1:21
    
can i send the array to a function in some other page ? –  Srinivas Thanneeru Dec 26 '13 at 16:52
    
@SrinivasThanneeru JS only runs in the current page. Unless you make it persist through some storage or bridging mechanism, then no. –  Joseph the Dreamer Dec 26 '13 at 16:56
var my_array = ["a", "b", "c"];
// or a popular way to define (mainly string) arrays:
var my_array = "abc".split("");

print_array(my_array);

function print_array(arr) {
   alert(arr);
}
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Why it's that a popular way to define such arrays and what does it do. How come a = "123".split("");console.log(a[0]+a[2]) gives 13? –  NULL Oct 27 '12 at 1:20
    
okay, so it's a popular way (I see it in many js libraries) to define arrays of strings. –  roberkules Oct 27 '12 at 1:23

You were using the same index 0

var my_array = new Array();
my_array[0] = "a";
my_array[1] = "b";
my_array[2] = "c";

JS Fiddle

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To extend Billy Moon's answer

You can define your array like this:

my_array = ["a", "b", "c"];

And like this:

my_array = [];
my_array[0] = "a";
// ...
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