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I wouldn't normally ask questions like this, but I really cant get my head around it. I have a class 'GetTableInfoFromDatabase', which connects to my database and downloads some JSON. This works great from the first screen of my tab-bar application. I can call the getNewData method as much as I want to effectively refresh the data.

My problem arises when I try and create an instance of the 'GetTableInfoFromDatabase' class and call the very same method from another tab. I get the following error:

*** -[GetTableInfoFromDatabase respondsToSelector:]: message sent to deallocated instance 0x1d89e830

The funny thing is, i'm using ARC. The culprit (in my opinion) is ASIHTTPRequest. I have had to enable -fno-objc-arc to get the project to compile. This library is used in the GetTableInfoFromDatabase class.

Here is the class:

- (void) getEventDataWithSender:(id)sender{


ASIHTTPRequest *request = [ASIHTTPRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"-------.com/getdata.php"]];
[request setDelegate:self];
NSLog(@"Running!");
[request startAsynchronous];
AppDelegate *appDelegate = (AppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
self.managedObjectContext = appDelegate.managedObjectContext;
}

And this is how i'm calling it:

GetTableInfoFromDatabase *getInfo = [[GetTableInfoFromDatabase alloc]init];
[getInfo getEventDataWithSender:self];

I've even changed the order of the tabs around, so the first tab to be displayed purely just calls this method, nothing else. Not even before the 'GetTableInfoFromDatabase' has been previously initialised by the class that initialised it first last time. Still crashes.

Has anyone got any ideas? This is so frustrating!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need to assign that variable to a property if you plan on exposing it to other view controllers. ARC will, and should, immediately deallocate getInfo after this code executes:

GetTableInfoFromDatabase *getInfo = [[GetTableInfoFromDatabase alloc]init];
[getInfo getEventDataWithSender:self];

So if this line is included in say viewDidLoad: and nothing else refers to getInfo in that method, it will be immediately released. Why, because you haven't told the compiler that it should retain it.

So in the view controller that's exposing this class, on whatever tab it might be a child of... you would do something like this:

ViewController.h

@class GetTableInfoFromDatabase;  // forward declaration

@interface ViewController : UIViewController

@property (strong, nonatomic) GetTableInfoFromDatabase *getInfo;

ViewController.m

@implementation ViewController

@synthesize getInfo = _getInfo;

- (void) viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.getInfo = [[GetTableInfoFromDatabase alloc]init]; // assign your value to a property

    [self.getInfo getEventDataWithSender:self];
}

So when you declare your property as Strong in your header, it will maintain a strong reference to it. @Synthesize getInfo = _getInfo means that it will create a getter and setter for self.getInfo around an instance variable named _getInfo. If you didn't want to expose it as a property, just an instance variable... you could do this:

ViewController.h

@class GetTableInfoFromDatabase;  // forward declaration

@interface ViewController : UIViewController {
    GetTableInfoFromDatabase _getInfo;
}

ViewController.m

@implementation ViewController

- (void) viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    _getInfo = [[GetTableInfoFromDatabase alloc]init]; // assign your value to a property

    [_getInfo getEventDataWithSender:self];
}

By default, the compiler will maintain a strong reference to that instance variable unless otherwise specified. You can have weak references as well, and all of those options are pretty well documented. So with ARC, or plain old memory management in general, you need to make an instance variable or property if you want it to hang around for a while.

Honestly... all ARC is doing for you is keeping you from having to call retain and release. Before ARC, setting that property would look like this:

    GetTableInfoFromDatabase getInfo = [[GetTableInfoFromDatabase alloc]init];

    self.getInfo = getInfo;

    [getInfo release];

Now with ARC, the compiler just writes that code for you ;) Hope this helps!

    [self.getInfo getEventDataWithSender:self];
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Thank you so much! I thought it would be something simple. Just a quick question though. Why do you use _ before a name to synthesize it? I've seen it done all over the place, but never really understood why. –  Alex Godbehere Oct 27 '12 at 13:19
    
It's just a widely adopted practice that indicates that variable is a private variable. If you named it the same, then the compiler would allow you to call the variable without the self prefix. This leads to leaks and confusion because in that instance, you are bypassing the setter method which handles retaining and releasing memory. –  jerrylroberts Oct 27 '12 at 14:00
    
Makes sense, thanks! –  Alex Godbehere Oct 27 '12 at 14:02
    
@jerrylroberts hi jerry , he code GetTableInfoFromDatabase *getInfo,so getInfo is strong , and then he call the getEventDataWithSender: in the same method scope , and why the ARC will release the getInfo, as you said exposing a var to other view controllers , it will be immediately released. is there any doc or blog said about it ? thank you –  Guo Luchuan Apr 21 '13 at 7:30

Your GetTableInfoFromDatabase object is being deallocated, almost certainly because nothing is holding a strong reference to it. In your code above, getInfo is a local variable, so I would expect it to be released very shortly after this code, unless you are storing it somewhere.

Almost certainly, your dealloc in GetTableInfoFromDatabase does not clear the request's delegate. You should be holding the request in an ivar of GetTableInfoFromDatabase so that it can remove itself as delegate when it is deallocated.

As a side note, avoid prefacing ObjC methods with get. That has a special meaning in KVC (it means that the first parameter is supposed to be updated by reference). Typically the kind of method you have here would be prefaced with "fetch."

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