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I am currently running this query:

SELECT t.videolink, t.userid, t.tag
    FROM (SELECT * FROM tagstrend ORDER BY timestamp DESC) AS t
        WHERE t.timestamp > ?
        GROUP BY t.tag
        ORDER BY SUM(t.tagcount) DESC
        LIMIT ?, 20;

What I am doing is reversing the order of the table that I am selecting from before I run the rest of the query because when the I use "GROUP BY" I need that to take the top result which is the most recent row in the database.

However doing this will take a hit on the performance/speed of the query because it needs to reverse the order of the table before it can query it.

My question is, is there a way to set the default order of the table to be reversed? Because I will always be SELECTing from this table in reverse order.

Unless someone knows a way of grouping by the most recent row in the database?

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Why are you calling SELECT on a SELECT * instead of just writing a single call that does what you want? –  tadman Oct 27 '12 at 4:00
    
Because I need the whole table, I just need it in reverse order @tadman –  StuartTheY Oct 27 '12 at 5:44
    
The order of your result has nothing to do with the order of the original table, since you're ordering by an aggregate function. –  Barmar Oct 27 '12 at 5:44
1  
A table in a relational database has no order. The question "reversing the order of the table" does not make sense. Only results of select statements can have an order (and only if an order by was specified). –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 27 '12 at 8:37
1  
@Barmar: I think the OP is trying to use this undocumented feature of MySQL whereby the returned value of a column that is neither aggregated nor included in GROUP BY is the one encountered first in the group's row set. So, they are selecting from a dataset pre-ordered in a specific way, to get the desired results. Again, that's not documented but that, at least, is what the OP seems to be doing in their query. See also this answer for an alternative explanation, for I'm not sure mine is clear enough. –  Andriy M Oct 27 '12 at 10:19
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"However doing this will take a hit on the performance/speed of the query because it needs to reverse the order of the table before it can query it."

I don't think that is true. Order By .... ASC and Order By .... DESC should have the same performance. Test it and see.

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