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I've been struggling with this and can't find a reason why my code is failing to properly read from a TCP server I've also written. I'm using the TcpClient class and its GetStream() method but something is not working as expected. Either the operation blocks indefinitely (the last read operation doesn't timeout as expected), or the data is cropped (for some reason a Read operation returns 0 and exits the loop, perhaps the server is not responding fast enough). These are three attempts at implementing this function:

// this will break from the loop without getting the entire 4804 bytes from the server 
string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
  var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
  var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
  var stm = client.GetStream();
  stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
  byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
  var memStream = new MemoryStream();
  int bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  while (bytes > 0)
  {
      memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytes);
      bytes = 0;
      if (stm.DataAvailable)
          bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  }
  return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}

// this will block forever. It reads everything but freezes when data is exhausted
string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
  var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
  var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
  var stm = client.GetStream();
  stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
  byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
  var memStream = new MemoryStream();
  int bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  while (bytes > 0)
  {
      memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytes);
      bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  }
  return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}

// inserting a sleep inside the loop will make everything work perfectly
string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
  var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
  var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
  var stm = client.GetStream();
  stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
  byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
  var memStream = new MemoryStream();
  int bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  while (bytes > 0)
  {
      memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytes);
      Thread.Sleep(20);
      bytes = 0;
      if (stm.DataAvailable)
          bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  }
  return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}

The last one "works", but it certainly looks ugly to put a hard-coded sleep inside the loop considering that sockets already support read timeouts! Do I need to setup some property(ies) on the TcpClient of the NetworkStream? Does the problem resides in the server? The server don't close the connections, it is up to the client to do so. The above is also running inside the UI thread context (test program), maybe it has something to do with that...

Do someone knows how to properly use NetworkStream.Read to read data until no more data is available? I guess what I'm wishing for is something like the old Win32 winsock timeout properties... ReadTimeout, etc. It tries to read until the timeout is reached, and then return 0... But it sometimes seem to return 0 when data should be available (or on the way.. can Read return 0 if is available?) and it then blocks indefinitely on the last read when data is not available...

Yes, I'm at a loss!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

If the "message" being sent to you can vary in size and you don't know in advance, then you have 3 ways to properly handle this:

  • have the message size encoded in the data (e.g. typically in a header i.e. the first few bytes)
  • use a special "end of message" marker, with the real data encoded/escaped if there is the possibility of real data being confused with an "end of marker"
  • use a timeout....i.e. a certain period of receiving no bytes means there is no more data for the message.

Each approach has it's pros and cons for "correctness".

The code below uses the "timeout" method, as that seems to be the one you want.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bk6w7hs8.aspx. You can get access to the NetworkStream on the TCPClient so you can change the ReadTimeout.

string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
  var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
  var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
  var stm = client.GetStream();
  // Set a 250 millisecond timeout for reading (instead of Infinite the default)
  stm.ReadTimeout = 250;
  stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
  byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
  var memStream = new MemoryStream();
  int bytesread = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  while (bytesread > 0)
  {
      memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytesread);
      bytesread = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
  }
  return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}

As a footnote for other variations on this writing network code...when doing a Read where you want to avoid a "block", you can check the DataAvailable flag and then ONLY read what is in the buffer checking the .Length property e.g. stm.Read(resp, 0, stm.Length);

share|improve this answer
    
The size is unknown, can be on the MB range... As I've said on the question, the third option does read everything correctly, but I can't accept the need for that Sleep there, and I can't explain it either. I know what it does: by sleeping I give time for data to arrive in the socket, but I didn't want to sleep 20ms if data arrived before that. I know how to do that with non-blocking reads and my own overlapped IO... but I don't think I should need to resort to that in .NET! –  Loudenvier Oct 27 '12 at 5:13
    
What method do you use to allow the reading to know if it's read all the data i.e. the right amount/size? The typical way is to use a size header that is encoded in the first part of the response. –  colinsmith Oct 27 '12 at 5:17
    
I do have a Content-lenght (the protocol is almost identical to HTTP), but for simplicity I would use a "incoming data timeout" and I thought that Read would block for a time and then timeout and not wait forever for that to arrive! With the "inside-loop" sleep I'll pay the 20ms price in every iteration, with a "incoming data timeout", I would pay it only when needed and at the last read. I can optimize it using the ContentLenght, but relying on the length alone is also risky as the server may misbehave and don't send everything! –  Loudenvier Oct 27 '12 at 5:24
    
You can set the ReadTimeout. –  colinsmith Oct 27 '12 at 5:45
    
ReadTimeout only times out after a read operation actually started. If no data arrives ever ReadTimeout has no effect. I'm looking into Socket.ReceiveTimeout... –  Loudenvier Oct 27 '12 at 5:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Setting the underlying socket ReceiveTimeout property did the trick. You can access it like this: yourTcpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout. You can read the docs for more information.

Now the code will only "sleep" as long as needed for some data to arrive in the socket, or it will raise an exception if no data arrives, at the beginning of a read operation, for more than 20ms. I can tweak this timeout if needed. Now I'm not paying the 20ms price in every iteration, I'm only paying it at the last read operation. Since I have the content-length of the message in the first bytes read from the server I can use it to tweak it even more and not try to read if all expected data has been already received.

I find using ReceiveTimeout much easier than implementing asynchronous read... Here is the working code:

string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
  var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
  var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
  var stm = client.GetStream();
  stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
  byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
  var memStream = new MemoryStream();
  var bytes = 0;
  client.Client.ReceiveTimeout = 20;
  do
  {
      try
      {
          bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
          memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytes);
      }
      catch (IOException ex)
      {
          // if the ReceiveTimeout is reached an IOException will be raised...
          // with an InnerException of type SocketException and ErrorCode 10060
          var socketExept = ex.InnerException as SocketException;
          if (socketExept == null || socketExept.ErrorCode != 10060)
              // if it's not the "expected" exception, let's not hide the error
              throw ex;
          // if it is the receive timeout, then reading ended
          bytes = 0;
      }
  } while (bytes > 0);
  return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful using this hack. We have a Java application that relied on socket timeout to detect end-of-message and from time to time we lost a byte in the stream. Admittedly I do not know if this also holds in .NET, but I suspect it is the underlying TCP/IP stack that was the cause. You are simply not supposed to reuse a socket after a timeout. –  Søren Boisen Jun 19 at 12:29
    
@SørenBoisen I'm not reusing the socket after the timeout... I won't loose data, but I can have a false "positive" timeout (if the network is slow data can take longer than the intercharacter timeout to arrive), but in this case the other side will simply handle a disconnection and, hopefully, try again. This is not actually a hack, the protocol, which I can't change, sends unknown sized messages, so I must rely on timeouts. I've actually made the code more robust with time, but didn't update the article. Now it's a good time. –  Loudenvier Jun 20 at 4:39

As per your requirement, Thread.Sleep is perfectly fine to use because you are not sure when the data will be available so you might need to wait for the data to become available. I have slightly changed the logic of your function this might help you little further.

string SendCmd(string cmd, string ip, int port)
{
    var client = new TcpClient(ip, port);
    var data = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetBytes(cmd);
    var stm = client.GetStream();
    stm.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    byte[] resp = new byte[2048];
    var memStream = new MemoryStream();

    int bytes = 0;

    do
    {
        bytes = 0;
        while (!stm.DataAvailable)
            Thread.Sleep(20); // some delay
        bytes = stm.Read(resp, 0, resp.Length);
        memStream.Write(resp, 0, bytes);
    } 
    while (bytes > 0);

    return Encoding.GetEncoding(1252).GetString(memStream.ToArray());
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
1  
I've written the method exactly as this after posting the question! Still I don't find it acceptable. If I was using good old WIN32 overlapped IO I could have "blocked" for 20 or more msecs until data started arriving, so my code could be safer with something like this pseudo-code: stm.ReadIfDataBecomesAvailableInUpTo(timeout=2000) I know 20ms is a small price to pay, but it will be paid in every interation! To ready a MB sized response it will be a HUGE OVERHEAD! I didn't want to resort to writing my own timeout logic... :-( –  Loudenvier Oct 27 '12 at 5:17
3  
You have to be careful with Sleeping on threads. If the time is too small, you are forcing unnecessary context switches on the OS, thus thrashing the CPU. A better mechanism would probably be interrupt-driven or 'event'-driven. For this you could use stm.BeginRead() which would allow you to have an event called when data is ready, that way your process can be in a blocked state where the OS will only awake it when the resource is ready. Sleep will yield back to the OS every time the process awoken. –  user1132959 Jun 18 '13 at 3:13

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