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I installed python using: brew install python and then eventually pip install Django. However when I try to run django-admin.py startproject test I just get a file not found. What did I forget?

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3  
django-admin is not on path, you could search for it find / -name django-admin.py and add it to your .profile/.bashrc/.whatever. Let me recommend using virtualenv for everything python related you do though. Installing it in a local environment prevents this kind of problem =) –  Erik Kronberg Oct 27 '12 at 8:23
    
Ahh yea thanks, it worked. –  Parris Oct 27 '12 at 8:31
    
Reposted it as an answer then ;) –  Erik Kronberg Oct 27 '12 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a gist to install django within a virtualenv and to create a project in a single step.

Note: You can use it for setting up your development environment. For production, check out this post.

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That is a cool script. Am I able to put multiple django projects into the root folder of a virtualenv? –  Parris Oct 27 '12 at 16:13
    
I don't think so. It's usually not considered a good practice to have multiple projects under a virtualenv as far as I know. You can have multiple apps within a project instead. That's the django way of doing things. –  Pramod Oct 27 '12 at 16:16
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You could, but the point is to isolate each project's environment. Imagine that project Foo needs to upgrade to Django 1.5, while project Bar can't upgrade yet ... Having one virtualenv per project does the trick. The other advantage is that it's easy to deploy a virtualenv. One your dev machine do pip freeze, store the output in a file like requirements.txt, then on your server just make a new virtualenv and run pip install -r requirements.txt. It will install all dependencies. Meanwhile, you can take a break B) In your case, it also solves the path problem. –  jpic Oct 27 '12 at 19:42

django-admin is not on path, you could search for it find / -name django-admin.py and add it to your .profile/.bashrc/.whatever. Let me recommend using virtualenv for everything python related you do though. Installing it in a local environment prevents this kind of problem.

Each environment comes with its own Python distribution, so you can keep different versions of Python in different environments. It also ignores globally installed packages with the --no-site-packages flag (which is default) but this doesn't work properly with packages installed using eg Ubuntu's apt-get (they are in dist-packages iirc). Any packages installed using pip or easy_install inside the environment are also only local. This lets you simulate different deployments. But most importantly, it keeps the global environment clean.

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It is way better to use virtualenv, and install django in the virtualenv.

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do I need to uninstall anything before getting started with virtualenv? and if so how should i go about clearing everything? –  Parris Oct 27 '12 at 8:36
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No, virtualenv will create an isolated environment -- ignoring everything you've installed "globally" thus far (if you use the --no-site-packages argument, but I think that's the default these days). –  vicvicvic Oct 27 '12 at 8:52
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Solution: use --system-site-packages. –  jpic Oct 27 '12 at 15:47
    
system-site-packages is now the default mode, isn't it? –  Pramod Oct 28 '12 at 4:02
    
--no-site-packages is the default. Just run virtualenv -h folks ! –  jpic Oct 28 '12 at 9:28

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