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I'm looking for something similar to attributes in Java, to use in an objective-c environment.

Suppose I have an implementation file with a bunch of methods defined. Is there any way I can mark them up such that I could find them with introspection at runtime? Something like;

##special_method
- (void)foo
{

}

##special_method
- (void)bar
{

}

// Not special
- (void)baz
{

}

As far as I know, nothing exists, and so the best idea I have is to prefix the method name with something common:

- (void)_special_foo
{

}

- (void)_special_bar
{

}

// Not special
- (void)baz
{

}

any other interesting ideas?

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What are those dashed prefixing the function headers meant to tell us? –  alk Oct 27 '12 at 8:41
    
These are not headers... but i guess that doesn't matter. I assume you are referring to special_bar, for example? Well my thinking is that the _special is just a convention I could follow to identify the special nature of the methods I'm looking for. This is less elegant than a true type of attribute so I'd like to avoid this approach if possible. –  darren Oct 27 '12 at 8:47
    
@alk it is the syntax for a member-method-start in Objective-C. If that throws you for loop you'd hurl biscuits on the messaging syntax. –  WhozCraig Oct 27 '12 at 9:25
    
Ah I see, so its about the objective part of the tags given, which is not part of my expertise ... thanks! @WhozCraig –  alk Oct 27 '12 at 9:37
3  
What are you trying to accomplish? –  NSResponder Oct 27 '12 at 10:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if I understand your question correctly, but as an "interesting" possible solution, you can use a global variable that is set to a unique value identifying a specific function on entry (and optionally resetting on exit), or you can use a stack to trace these values that you can inspect at any time.

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This is actually a really good idea. thank you. –  darren Oct 27 '12 at 19:45
    
Umm, so you would call every method on an object, without regard to the side effects or preconditions involved, just to see if it sets some global variable? –  Arkku Oct 31 '12 at 0:24
    
@Arkku: it may help if you think it an adapted form of profiling for real/run-time inspection –  slashmais Oct 31 '12 at 7:16

Since you are implementing the class, why not just define a method that returns a list of the special methods in that class? If you need to do subclasses, have them get the parent's list and add to it.

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Apple's suggestion to identify private methods is to give a unique prefix:

Names of most private methods in the Cocoa frameworks have an underscore prefix (for example, _fooData) to mark them as private. From this fact follow two recommendations.

  • Don’t use the underscore character as a prefix for your private methods. Apple reserves this convention.

  • If you are subclassing a large Cocoa framework class (such as NSView or UIView) and you want to be absolutely sure that your private methods have names different from those in the superclass, you can add your own prefix to your private methods. The prefix should be as unique as possible, perhaps one based on your company or project and of the form "XX_". So if your project is called Byte Flogger, the prefix might be BF_addObject:

I suppose you could use a similar scheme to mark certain methods as special for some sort of runtime manipulation.

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DO NOT start any method names with a single leading underscore. That's an Apple internal coding convention to keep their method names from colliding with yours. If you want to differentiate your method names, just use a common prefix.

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