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I have following piece of code :

fis = new FileInputStream(new File(st[0]));
br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));
while(fis.available()!=-1)
{
  System.out.println(br.readLine());
  System.out.println(fis.available());
}

The first println statement prints whole of my file but alongside second println statement always shows 0. why when there is actual content to read, is it showing 0 ? and what should i put as end condition over here.

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Why are you checking for -1? Where exactly does it say that available() will ever return -1? –  EJP Oct 27 '12 at 12:14
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to stop when readLine() returns null, something like this:

            String sCurrentLine;

        br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\testing.txt"));

        while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(sCurrentLine);
        }
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availabe() is returning the amount of bytes that can be read for that InputStream when it is not blocking. your readLine() is blocking that InputStream.

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Thanks ..!! You all were right !! –  aditya parikh Oct 27 '12 at 9:56
    
you are welcome! –  PbxMan Oct 27 '12 at 10:06
    
Not correct. It returns the 'number of bytes that can be read without blocking'. See the Javadoc. That's not the same thing as 'when it is not blocking'. All input streams are blocking, always. –  EJP Oct 27 '12 at 12:13
    
and of course the other users are answering the question? –  PbxMan Oct 27 '12 at 13:21
    
Boann's answer is correct, and correctly stated too, but how that impinges on the incorrectness of your answer is a mystery to me. –  EJP Oct 27 '12 at 23:27
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The first println statement prints whole of my file but alongside second println statement always shows 0.

You're checking available() twice. After you've read some data, it's no longer available to read, so the available() value printed is different to the one used for the loop condition above.

Secondly, you're reading from the BufferedReader, which does its own buffering of the data from the input stream. That means it's wrong to then sneak around the reader's back to call the available method of the underlying input stream!

Try this:

for (;;) {
    String line = br.readLine();
    if (line == null) break;
    System.out.println(line);
}
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Thanks ..!! You all were right !! –  aditya parikh Oct 27 '12 at 9:57
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