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I am running a Qt application on embedded Linux platform. The system has 128 MB RAM, 512MB NAND, no swap. The application uses a custom library for the peripherals, the rest are all Qt and c/c++ libs. The application uses SQLITE3 as well.

After 2-3 hours, the machine starts running very slow, shell commands take 10 or so seconds to respond. Eventually the machine hangs, and finally OOM killer kills the application, and the system starts behaving at normal speed.

After some system memory observations using top command reveals that while application is running, the system free memory is decreasing, while slab keeps on increasing. These are the snaps of top given below. The application is named xyz.

At Application start :

Mem total:126164 anon:3308 map:8436 free:32456
 slab:60936 buf:0 cache:27528 dirty:0 write:0
Swap total:0 free:0
  PID   VSZ VSZRW^  RSS (SHR) DIRTY (SHR) STACK COMMAND
  776 29080  9228  8036   528   968     0    84 ./xyz -qws
  781  3960   736  1976  1456   520     0    84 sshd: root@notty
  786  3676   680  1208   764   416     0    88 /usr/libexec/sftp-server
  770  3792   568  1948  1472   464     0    84 {sshd} sshd: root@pts/0
  766  3792   568   956   688   252     0    84 /usr/sbin/sshd
  388  1864   284   552   332   188     0    84 udevd --daemon
  789  2832   272   688   584    84     0    84 top
  774  2828   268   668   560    84     0    84 -sh
  709  2896   268   556   464    80     0    84 /usr/sbin/inetd
  747  2828   268   596   516    68     0    84 /sbin/getty -L ttymxc0 115200 vt100
  777  2824   264   444   368    68     0    84 tee out.log
  785  2824   264   484   416    68     0    84 sh -c /usr/libexec/sftp-server
    1  2824   264   556   488    64     0    84 init

After some time :

    Mem total:126164 anon:3312 map:8440 free:9244
 slab:83976 buf:0 cache:27584 dirty:0 write:0
Swap total:0 free:0
  PID   VSZ VSZRW^  RSS (SHR) DIRTY (SHR) STACK COMMAND
  776 29080  9228  8044   528   972     0    84 ./xyz -qws
  781  3960   736  1976  1456   520     0    84 sshd: root@notty
  786  3676   680  1208   764   416     0    88 /usr/libexec/sftp-server
  770  3792   568  1948  1472   464     0    84 {sshd} sshd: root@pts/0
  766  3792   568   956   688   252     0    84 /usr/sbin/sshd
  388  1864   284   552   332   188     0    84 udevd --daemon
  789  2832   272   688   584    84     0    84 top
  774  2828   268   668   560    84     0    84 -sh
  709  2896   268   556   464    80     0    84 /usr/sbin/inetd
  747  2828   268   596   516    68     0    84 /sbin/getty -L ttymxc0 115200 vt100
  777  2824   264   444   368    68     0    84 tee out.log
  785  2824   264   484   416    68     0    84 sh -c /usr/libexec/sftp-server
    1  2824   264   556   488    64     0    84 init

Funnily though, I can not see any major changes in the output of top involving the application itself. Eventually the application is killed, top output after that :

    Mem total:126164 anon:2356 map:916 free:2368
 slab:117944 buf:0 cache:1580 dirty:0 write:0
Swap total:0 free:0
  PID   VSZ VSZRW^  RSS (SHR) DIRTY (SHR) STACK COMMAND
  781  3960   736   708   184   520     0    84 sshd: root@notty
  786  3724   728   736   172   484     0    88 /usr/libexec/sftp-server
  770  3792   568   648   188   460     0    84 {sshd} sshd: root@pts/0
  766  3792   568   252     0   252     0    84 /usr/sbin/sshd
  388  1864   284   188     0   188     0    84 udevd --daemon
  819  2832   272   676   348    84     0    84 top
  774  2828   268   512   324    96     0    84 -sh
  709  2896   268    80     0    80     0    84 /usr/sbin/inetd
  747  2828   268    68     0    68     0    84 /sbin/getty -L ttymxc0 115200 vt100
  785  2824   264    68     0    68     0    84 sh -c /usr/libexec/sftp-server
    1  2824   264    64     0    64     0    84 init

The dmesg shows :

sh invoked oom-killer: gfp_mask=0xd0, order=2, oomkilladj=0
[<c002d4c4>] (unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xd4) from [<c0073ac0>]              (oom_kill_process+0x54/0x1b8)
[<c0073ac0>] (oom_kill_process+0x54/0x1b8) from [<c0073f14>] (__out_of_memory+0x154/0x178)
[<c0073f14>] (__out_of_memory+0x154/0x178) from [<c0073fa0>] (out_of_memory+0x68/0x9c)
[<c0073fa0>] (out_of_memory+0x68/0x9c) from [<c007649c>] (__alloc_pages_nodemask+0x3e0/0x4c8)
[<c007649c>] (__alloc_pages_nodemask+0x3e0/0x4c8) from [<c0076598>] (__get_free_pages+0x14/0x4c)
[<c0076598>] (__get_free_pages+0x14/0x4c) from [<c002f528>] (get_pgd_slow+0x14/0xdc)
[<c002f528>] (get_pgd_slow+0x14/0xdc) from [<c0043890>] (mm_init+0x84/0xc4)
[<c0043890>] (mm_init+0x84/0xc4) from [<c0097b94>] (bprm_mm_init+0x10/0x138)
[<c0097b94>] (bprm_mm_init+0x10/0x138) from [<c00980a8>] (do_execve+0xf4/0x2a8)
[<c00980a8>] (do_execve+0xf4/0x2a8) from [<c002afc4>] (sys_execve+0x38/0x5c)
[<c002afc4>] (sys_execve+0x38/0x5c) from [<c0027d20>] (ret_fast_syscall+0x0/0x2c)
Mem-info:
DMA per-cpu:
CPU    0: hi:    0, btch:   1 usd:   0
Normal per-cpu:
CPU    0: hi:   42, btch:   7 usd:   0
Active_anon:424 active_file:11 inactive_anon:428
 inactive_file:3 unevictable:0 dirty:0 writeback:0 unstable:0
 free:608 slab:29498 mapped:14 pagetables:59 bounce:0
DMA free:692kB min:268kB low:332kB high:400kB active_anon:0kB inactive_anon:0kB active_file:4kB inactive_file:0kB unevictable:0kB present:24384kB pages_scanned:0 all_unreclaimable? no
lowmem_reserve[]: 0 103 103
Normal free:1740kB min:1168kB low:1460kB high:1752kB active_anon:1696kB inactive_anon:1712kB active_file:40kB inactive_file:12kB unevictable:0kB present:105664kB pages_scanned:0 all_unreclaimable? no
lowmem_reserve[]: 0 0 0
DMA: 3*4kB 3*8kB 5*16kB 2*32kB 4*64kB 2*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 692kB
Normal: 377*4kB 1*8kB 4*16kB 1*32kB 2*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB = 1740kB
30 total pagecache pages
0 pages in swap cache
Swap cache stats: add 0, delete 0, find 0/0
Free swap  = 0kB
Total swap = 0kB
32768 pages of RAM
687 free pages
1306 reserved pages
29498 slab pages
59 pages shared
0 pages swap cached
Out of memory: kill process 774 (sh) score 339 or a child
Killed process 776 (xyz)

So it's obvious that there is a memory leak, it must be my app since my app is killed. But I am not doing any malloc s from the program. I have taken care as to limit the scope of variables so that they are deallocated after they are used. So I am at a complete loss as to why is slab increasing in the top output. I have tried http://valgrind.org/docs/manual/faq.html#faq.reports but didn't work.

Currently trying to use Valgrind on desktop (since I have read it only works for arm-cortex) to check my business logic.

Addittional info :

root@freescale ~/Application/app$ uname -a
Linux freescale 2.6.31-207-g7286c01 #2053 Fri Jun 22 10:29:11 IST 2012 armv5tejl GNU/Linux
Compiler : arm-none-linux-gnueabi-4.1.2 glibc2.5
cpp libs : libstdc++.so.6.0.8
Qt : 4.7.3 libs

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated...

share|improve this question
2  
Well you are not doing any mallocs, but you are using a couple of libraries that probably are doing mallocs. So perhaps you are not using those libraries properly and that is what is causing your memory leak. –  john Oct 27 '12 at 9:54
    
maybe, but that is what I am trying to find out. Valgrind is reporting leaks in all Qt libs...don't have a clue why. But I am checking the libraries also. –  aditya Oct 27 '12 at 10:00
    
There are many questions on SO regarding Qt and memory leaks, Valgrind often reports false positives due to Qt's implicit sharing and plugin systems. –  cmannett85 Oct 27 '12 at 12:07
    
yes, I've read about that, but the annoying thng is that Valgrind is not reporting any leaks in business logic or those other libs. Now I am going to run this application on desktop to see if it gives same behaviour, so at least I'll know is it a platform/peripheral library problem. –  aditya Oct 29 '12 at 3:43
3  
"it must be my app since my app is killed" -- No. No. No. That is a common misconception. The OOM killer as such is total shit, it will kill an arbitrary (read as: random, in more recent kernel versions with some heuristics) process. Your process being killed does not mean that it is leaking or that it has any guilt (other than existing) with the OOM condition at all. –  Damon Oct 29 '12 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

If you have some data structure allocation, check for the correctness of adding children and etc.. I had similar bug in my code. Also if you make big and large queries to the database it may use more ram memory. Try to find some memory leak detector to find if there is any leak.

share|improve this answer
    
this was intent to be comment, not answer! –  Don Angelo Annoni Oct 27 '12 at 10:06
    
actually, as I am trying Valgrind as I noted above, it keeps reporting leaks in Qt libs. Thanks for the reply. –  aditya Oct 27 '12 at 10:06

I don't think the problem is directly in your code. The reason is obvious: your application space does not increase (both RSS and VSW do not increase).

However, you do see the number of slabs increasing. You cannot use or increase the number of slabs from your application - it's a kernel-only thingie.

Some obvious causes of slab size increase from the top of my head:

  • you never really close network sockets
  • you read many files, but never close them
  • you use many ioctls

I would run strace and look at its output for a while. strace intercepts interactions with the kernel. If you have memory issues, I'd expect repeated calls to brk(). If you have other issues, you'll see repeated calls to open without close.

share|improve this answer
    
well, I can safely rule out network sockets as I am not using them (I'm very sure, I've even shut off the GPRS). I am using files, but 6 in total, including the database, and I've taken care of closing them as well. But there is definitely heavy ioctl activity, because of the peripherals (strace confirms it). Not a lot of open calls though. BTW, isn't slab affected if mallocs called from the app ??? –  aditya Oct 29 '12 at 12:13
    
@aditya: No, slab is a memory pool for usage within the kernel only. malloc()s get converted by glibc to brk() calls - for larger areas. the areas that are created by glibc are then handed out in whatever small chunks the application needs. –  Klaas van Gend Oct 29 '12 at 20:49

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