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I'm stuck on a regex problem. I want to match things that are not a whitespace or a newline.

Not whitespace is simply:

[^ ]

does not mean not whitespace or newline is:

[^( |\n)]
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See ?regex in R. You may probably also be interested in searching for [:space:] in your regex, which matches "Space characters: tab, newline, vertical tab, form feed, carriage return, space and possibly other locale-dependent characters." –  Ananda Mahto Oct 27 '12 at 10:40
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No,

[^( |\n)]

means "any character that's neither a space, a (, a ), a |, or a newline.

The [] is called a character class. It matches a single character from a list, optionally negated with the ^ at the beginning.

What you want is

[^ \n]

(or \S if you also want to exclude line feeds, form feeds and tabs from the range of legal matches).

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If you don't mind excluding tabs as well, you can use the \s and \S shortcuts which respectively include or exclude white spaces, tabs, and line breaks.

In your case the regex expression '\S' will match any character that is not a whitespace, tab, or line break.

From quick reference guide: http://www.regular-expressions.info/reference.html

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[^\s] 

I don't known how it is in R but generally \s means white char http://www.regular-expressions.info/charclass.html#shorthand

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Either \S or [^\s], which are equivalent.

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You don't need the square brackets on the first one. –  Asad Oct 27 '12 at 10:12
    
It would have worked with the brackets (bitter over getting edited) –  Tyress Oct 29 '12 at 3:45
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